Our new Digital Magazine – Doc006

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‘DOC006 – The Ties That Bind’ is our new digital magazine. Released to coincide with our exhibition of the same name at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, from 26th Sept- 24th April 2016.

Created in collaboration with acclaimed digital masterminds Start Digital, who we enjoyed working with on our first Digital Magazine, ‘The Ties That Bind’ is an easy to download digital catalogue showcasing four projects, from the four members of Document Scotland.

Download this digital exhibition catalogue now from the Apple Store or from Google Play

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Each of the four projects Unsullied and Untarnished by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, When Saturday Comes, by Colin McPherson Drawn to The Land by Sophie Gerrard and A Sweet Forgetting, by Stephen McLaren are those featured in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery exhibition, which has been curated by Anne Lyden.  Here in the app they appear with new and unseen images accompanied by text, audio and multimedia photofilms.

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We’ve been delighted to work again with the team at Start Digital. They created our first digital app for us, and since then we’ve really appreciated the versatility and impact of this digital platform. The layouts are clear and present Document Scotland’s images in a gallery layout. The audio and multimedia adds depth to projects elevating them above the simple layout of the ‘magazine page’ and into a multi dimensional experience. Interactive maps and evocative audio recordings add further complement the projects.

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We hope that you will download and enjoy this exciting new digital publication –

This digital exhibition catalogue ‘Document Scotland: The Ties That Bind’ is available for download for Android and iOS devices from Google Play and the App Store.

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Working The Border – Carlisle Photo Festival

Many thanks to Malcolm Dickson and Street Level Photoworks Glasgow for including work by Sophie Gerrard, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert and Colin McPherson in an exhibition entitled ‘Working The Border’  at Carlisle Photo Festival recently. Situated on the railway bridge linking Northbound and Southbound platforms at Carlisle Railway Station, the exhibition also includes work by Colin Gray, Andy Wiener and Donald John MacLean. The festival itself was on from 7th – 15th November, however, the works on the railway bridge remain in place.

All the bodies of work featured are based upon or comment on the Anglo-Scottish border and notions of national identity, landscape and history.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert's images from 'Edge of an Empire' installed at Carlisle Photo Festival © Streetlevel Photoworks November 2014

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s images from ‘Edge of an Empire’ installed at Carlisle Photo Festival. Image © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

 

Carlisle Photo Festival © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

Sophie Gerrard’s images from ‘Drawn To The Land’ installed at Carlisle Photo Festival. Image © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

 

Carlisle Photo Festival Colin McPherson's images from 'A Fine Line' installed at Carlisle Photo Festival © Streetlevel Photoworks November 2014© Streetlevel Photoworks November 2014

Colin McPherson’s images from ‘A Fine Line’ installed at Carlisle Photo Festival. Image © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

 

Originally shown in Document Scotland’s summer exhibition ‘Beyond The Border’ at Impressions Gallery in Bradford, the images chosen for ‘Working The Border’ include those from Sophie’s ‘Drawn To The Land’, Colin’s ‘A Fine Line’ and Jeremy’s ‘Edge of an Empire’.

 

Carlisle Photo Festival © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

Carlisle Photo Festival. Image © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

 

Carlisle Photo Festival © Streetlevel Photoworks November 2014

Carlisle Photo Festival. Image © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

 

Working the Border’ explores the geophysical & cartographic line that separates Scotland from England.  It borrows its title from the larger work by ae phor, a selection of which was exhibited in the waiting room on Platform 4, accompanied by a soundwork ‘Border Fiddle Music’. This space also included a selected series from Jo Metson Scott’s ‘The Borderland’ project, which was shown for the first time, alongside ‘Schengland’ and ‘The Debatable Land’ by Alan Knox.

 

Carlisle Photo Festival © Streetlevel Photoworks November 2014

The waiting room on platform 4 at Carlisle Railway Station for Carlisle Photo Festival. Image © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

 

Carlisle Photo Festival © Streetlevel Photoworks November 2014

Alan Knox’s ‘Schengland’ installed at Carlisle Photo Festival. Image © Claire Maxwell, courtesy Street Level Photoworks November 2014

 

The festival was on from 7th – 15th November – only a week, however, the work on the railway bridges remains in place, so, if you’re in town, or waiting for a connection, or passing through at 100mph on a Virgin train – be sure to take a look!

 

 

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Journey’s end

The fence which separates Scotland and England in the Cheviot Hills. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

The fence which separates Scotland from England in the Cheviot hills. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

After a year exploring Scotland’s 96-mile border with England, Document Scotland’s Colin McPherson finally reached the point of no return. Here he explains some of the discoveries he made during his journey from the Sark to the sea.

“Photographers love journeys. From its earliest history, our predecessors found new locations, often in far-off lands, to explore and record epic adventures and discover new territories.

My journey was slightly different, in that it involved coming ‘home’. As an exile in England, I have long had that slightly schizophrenic feeling of being rooted in two places: the home where I live with my family, surrounded by people and places I love, things that I do and familiar feelings. The place where I belong. Then there’s the other home: the place where I am from, which still tugs at my heart, makes me grimly nostalgic and longing for the smell of the heathery hillsides and the breweries of Auld Reekie.

Pointing the way in the Cheviot hills. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

Pointing the way in the Cheviot hills. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

So for me, the voyage of discovery I set out on 12 months ago along Scotland’s frontier with its southern neighbour was always going to be about much more that the physical geography of the border. More even than the political, social and cultural similarities and differences between the people whose lives straddle the divide. No, it was always going to be about me and how I feel about Scotland, about what has happened to my nation in the past and what awaits her in the near and distant future.

The summit of the Cheviot, shrouded in fog and mystery. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

The summit of the Cheviot, shrouded in fog and mystery. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

I set out without a plan, but with a head full of research, ideas, themes and possibilities. I left a lot to chance: encounters led to conversations and I found myself talking obliquely on subjects as diverse as bowling in Gretna, Black Rock hens, God, salmon fishing, shopping in Kelso and even, occasionally, that referendum.

The border is much more than rolling hills, fresh air and tiny towns nestling in the landscape. The people are as diverse as almost anywhere else on these islands. The characteristics of the Borders are often defined by battles, poets, rugby and farming. But there’s more there if you care to look hard enough. And there’s the border itself. Half mirror, half barrier? Or a feathered edge which simultaneously unites and divides and at the same time defines.

An undignified entry into Scotland. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

An undignified entry into Scotland. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

With the exception of a winter expedition to conquer the mighty summit of the Cheviot (whose apex peeks over into Scotland from Northumbria), I undertook the whole project on my own. On that occasion my companion was my longest-standing friend, fellow artist and exile, Scott Anderson. On the freezing slopes we were little boys again, imagining we were part of those invading armies of yore, engaged in creating historical facts on the ground. The warm welcome of the pub at Kirk Yetholm brought us back into the 21st century, wind-battered but happy.

Home from home. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

Home from home. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

The full story of my year on the roads, hills, fields and lanes will be told at Document Scotland’s forthcoming ‘Beyond the Border’ exhibition at Impressions Gallery, Bradford (1st July – 27th September, 2014) where my project, entitled ‘A Fine Line’ will be shown in full for the first time.”

 

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The Common Riding

“I’m are very pleased to announce that today Cafe Royal Books, run and published by Craig Atkinson, have published a little limited edition (of 150) ‘zine book of my Common Riding photographs. All the images were shot in 2000, in the Scottish Borders, and 14 of them form the 28page black and white ‘zine.

All the ‘zines are numbered and if you’d like to buy one they can be found here on Cafe Royal Books website and are on sale at £5.00 each, plus package and posting. The ‘zine is published in an edition of 150, but not all of those will go on sale.

Other photographers published by Craig as part of the same series are Homer Sykes, David Levenson, Craig Atkinson, Peter Dench, John Claridge and more. Many great photographers whom I admire, and much great photography. I’m very pleased and excited to have my work alongside the work of them in the series, and I’m grateful to Craig at Cafe Royal Books for his interest in my work and bringing it to a bigger audience. I hope you can take a look.” – Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert

 

Curds and Creams Repast, in St. Leonard’s Hut, Hawick. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert and Cafe Royal Books 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Catching packets of snuff, at dawn, Hawick. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert and Cafe Royal Books 2013, all rights reserved.

 

‘Crying the Langholm fair’, Langholm. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert and Cafe Royal Books 2013, all rights reserved.

See the whole set of Scottish Common Riding photographs, from 2000, in Hawick, Langholm and Selkirk, here.

 

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