FLOW PhotoFest

Document Scotland are very pleased to announce that we’re being represented in the inaugural Flow PhotoFestival, with two bodies of work. The new photography festival takes place across the Highlands of Scotland throughout September.

Colin McPherson’s images of Scottish football culture, the When Saturday Comes series, are on show at the Eden Court, Bishops Rd, Inverness, IV3 5SA. From 2nd – 30th Sept.

Colin’s work documents the ‘beautiful game’ and photographs of football culture in Scotland. Exploring the social process which surrounds football, McPherson immerses himself, and the viewer, into the rituals and practices of the fan as they embark on their weekly experience of football. Attention is given to the banal and the everyday details of the manner in which football is performed by the fan in the season. McPherson produces illuminating and insightful work on a ubiquitous aspect of contemporary Scottish culture. This work was previously shown at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh.

 

‘Craigroyston, 2006’ from the series ‘When Saturday Comes’. ©Colin McPherson 2017, all rights reserved.

 

‘Alloa Athletic, 2010’ from the series ‘When Saturday Comes’. ©Colin McPherson 2017, all rights reserved.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s North Sea Fishing images are being exhibited at St. Fergus Gallery, Wick Library, Sinclair Terrace, Wick, KW1 5AB. The show runs from 9th Sept – 21st Oct.

High Life Highland are delighted to be hosting a striking exhibition of black and white images shot aboard the seine net fishing boats, Mairead and Argosy, in the North Sea in the 1990’s. These images, by Scottish documentary photographer Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, capture the reality of the life at sea for the fishermen of Scotland’s North East fishing communities – the cramped conditions, the monotony, and the gruelling work in harsh conditions.

Aboard the ‘Argosy’ seine-net fishing boat, in the North Sea, Scotland, February 1995. Photograph by ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1995, all rights reserved.

 

Bill Smith secures the nets, aboard the ‘Argosy’ seine-net fishing boat in the North Sea, Scotland, February 1995. Photograph by ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1995, all rights reserved.

 

The FLOW PhotoFest runs through September at a variety of galleries and exhibition spaces throughout the Highlands of Scotland.

 

 

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Home and away with Albion Rovers

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Cliftonhill is one of the most evocative grounds in Scottish football, yet one suspects hardly anyone in Scotland could describe what it looks like or even – given Albion Rovers’ name – where it is. Photographer Iain McLean has spent many years visiting the ground as a fan and a photographer. His project, entitled More Than Just A Football Club has recently been published in book form. Here he chats to Document Scotland’s Colin McPherson, himself an aficionado of lower-league Scottish football, about his striking images of the Coatbridge-based club.

CM: I have several memories of visiting Cliftonhill in the 1980s with the team I supported, Meadowbank Thistle. The rubble-strewn ground was in a ruinous state, with its dungeon-like toilets and crumbling main stand and an owner who seemed part of the problem not the solution. And yet… it was always one of my favourite away days. From arriving at the ironic-sounding Sunnyside station to a pint in Big O’s before the game, the trip to Albion Rovers was always eagerly anticipated. When did you first connect with the club?

IM: In season 2000/01 my friend and Rovers stalwart Bill Walker suggested coming along to the club when I was on the lookout for a longterm photo project. I had never been to Coatbridge before and knew nothing of its history never mind anything about Albion Rovers. I’ll never forget seeing the stadium for the first time – a blaze of yellow and red alongside a busy road. It had an oddly exotic appearance from the outside with the colours standing out against the cold North Lanarkshire backdrop. I was impressed. Bill secured me permission to take pictures and I got started immediately. I found the fans to be welcoming and despite the state of the stadium – as you say, it was in need of a bit of TLC – I had a good feeling about being there. I originally shot on film – HP5 – developing and printing in my shed, and in the first season produced a few decent prints from games against Peterhead, Dumbarton and East Stirlingshire.

Albion Rovers v Arbroath, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

Albion Rovers v Arbroath, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

 

CM: Ah yes, those evocative colours, bright red and almost luminous yellow, certainly stood out from the more familiar grey sky which seemed to be ever-present there. I was particularly fond of Rovers’ mid-1980s strip which featured a series of red diagonal stripes to complement the then sponsors Tunnocks. A design classic. Your images are monochrome of course, so we’ll just have to add the colour in our imagination. What was the rationale behind using black-and-White for the project?

IM: Despite the colourful exterior,  as soon as I saw the inside of the stadium I knew the photographs had to be mono as the inside harked back to another time. Black-and-white gives the pictures a more timeless feel and also gives the whole project continuity. Your own excellent pictures in When Saturday Comes are to an extent dictated by editorial needs, but I have a little bit more freedom when it comes to how the pics are presented.

CM: Actually the WSC images reflect very much my approach to photographing football – the magazine gives me complete autonomy, it’s just the style I’ve developed over the last decade. I’d be interested in photographing a football project in mono, but I’m so drawn to the colour palette that I can’t imagine ever doing it. I think your images work really well in black-and-white as the emotion of what you capture is laid bare more starkly. You have also had the opportunity to stay close to the story, as it were, and develop a strong narrative. I love the ups-and-downs you portray. Were the Rovers supporters aware of who you are and what you are doing?

IM: I started very anonymously, just quietly mooching around seeing what was happening. Slowly the fans have become aware of me and what I am up to and I suspect I am viewed with something between mild suspicion and vague curiosity. The pics have been exhibited a few times as well as been published in local and national press, so they are well used to seeing their photographs in the public domain. I also offer a free print to anyone who asks for one by way of thanks as it is the least I can do to repay people for their help. Given that our average gate is around the 400 mark, I’m a bit limited with potential models but try not to feature the same characters too often. There are some brilliant subjects though and amongst my favourites are Andy and Mary. They are real golden-hearted gems who are, as they say in football, 110% loyal to the club, attending fundraising nights and events. Mary swears that by taking her knitting to away games it brings the club good luck. The fans (hopefully) realise that I am not out to embarrass anyone or make them appear foolish – certainly there are often quirky scenes or incidents that present themselves, but I love showing the humanity and warmth this particular group of people have. I guess the project could be about anything – I originally approached a local rugby club – but lucky for me Albion Rovers came along at the right time.

CM: Have you ever thought about widening it to include the playing staff, management, etc. Albion Rovers have had a few great characters down the years: I can imagine a night out with the legendary Vic Kasule might have had the film spinning through your camera! I suppose what I am asking is are you intending to carry on the the series, or do you feel the book marks the final chapter? It’s always difficult to know when to draw a project to a halt. There are usually milestones, after which the photographer takes stock and decides whether it’s worth carrying on. Where are you with it all?

IM: At one point I attempted to contact local people with a view to photographing them and hearing their thoughts about living next to a football stadium. Sadly nobody replied to the leaflets I posted through doors, but it may be worth another push with this idea perhaps offering some kind of incentive. Every time I think about bringing the project to an end a new opportunity arises. This year we are playing some excellent football and are currently holding our own in League 1, which is surprising because we were everyone’s favourites for the drop. So I have had new opportunities to visit new clubs (who are not in League 2) and also had the chance to record last year’s League Championship win, which as you would imagine was a fantastic day for the club and also for photo opportunities. Eventually I’d like to have a large exhibition of the photos – but first need a location and a good editor! The club have been accommodating and really helpful towards me. Provided I am not a nuisance I am allowed to go about my business in a quiet and discreet manner. I have seen various directors, chairmen and managers come and go but I rarely have any dialogue with them, although last week I met one of the directors for the first time when he was helping serve tea and coffee in the players lounge! A recent request to photograph the home, away and referee’s changing rooms was granted without any quibble and I am sure the club see the positive side to the project when we get good media coverage and have exhibitions here and there.

CM: So where can we get a hold of More Than Just A Football Club then?

IM: The 50 page photojournal is available priced £9.99 (+ p&p) from my websiteIt is also available from: Street Level Photoworks, Albion Roversfootball club, Summerlee Museum and Battlefield Framers in Glasgow.

CM: Thanks very much Iain, it’s been great talking to you. Up the Rovers!

Groundsman, Cliftonhill. Albion Rovers v Montrose, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

Groundsman, Cliftonhill, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

 

Albion Rovers v Montrose, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

Albion Rovers v Montrose, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

 

Albion Rovers mascot, 2015. Albion Rovers v Montrose, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

Albion Rovers mascot, 2015. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

 

Berwick Rangers v Albion Rovers, 2011. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

Berwick Rangers v Albion Rovers, 2011. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

 

Rangers v Albion Rovers, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

Rangers v Albion Rovers, 2014. Photograph © Iain McLean, all rights reserved

 

Colin McPherson is “In Conversation With…” writer Kevin Williamson on Thursday 7th April, 2016 at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh at 6pm. Entrey is free.

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The Beautiful Game

Edinburgh City versus Spartans. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

Edinburgh City versus Spartans. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

 

One of the most pleasing spin-offs from the launch of our show at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery has been the blizzard of positive press coverage for the show.

Added to this, the BBC commissioned and made a short film about Colin McPherson’s work, which has been released on the corporation’s website today. Focusing on the images from When Saturday Comes, filmmaker Dan Curtis spent last weekend interviewing Colin in the gallery and then following him around as he photographed local club Edinburgh City as they hosted Spartans FC in a match at the Commonwealth Stadium.

 

The Grandstand at Meadowbank Stadium. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

The Grandstand at Meadowbank Stadium. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

 

The film identifies what Colin looks for when photographing football and combines stills from The Ties That Bind with the images captured during last Saturday’s game.

 

Happy Edinburgh City players. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

Happy Edinburgh City players. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

 

The film is intended for broadcast on the BBC terrestrial television, so you might get a chance to see it on programmes across the network at some point very soon. And in case you wondered, City defeated Spartans 1-0!

 

Colin and Document Scotland would like to thank Dan Curtis for making the film, Edinburgh City FC for being such generous hosts and the staff at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery for facilitating the filming.

 

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Our new Digital Magazine – Doc006

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‘DOC006 – The Ties That Bind’ is our new digital magazine. Released to coincide with our exhibition of the same name at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, from 26th Sept- 24th April 2016.

Created in collaboration with acclaimed digital masterminds Start Digital, who we enjoyed working with on our first Digital Magazine, ‘The Ties That Bind’ is an easy to download digital catalogue showcasing four projects, from the four members of Document Scotland.

Download this digital exhibition catalogue now from the Apple Store or from Google Play

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Each of the four projects Unsullied and Untarnished by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, When Saturday Comes, by Colin McPherson Drawn to The Land by Sophie Gerrard and A Sweet Forgetting, by Stephen McLaren are those featured in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery exhibition, which has been curated by Anne Lyden.  Here in the app they appear with new and unseen images accompanied by text, audio and multimedia photofilms.

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We’ve been delighted to work again with the team at Start Digital. They created our first digital app for us, and since then we’ve really appreciated the versatility and impact of this digital platform. The layouts are clear and present Document Scotland’s images in a gallery layout. The audio and multimedia adds depth to projects elevating them above the simple layout of the ‘magazine page’ and into a multi dimensional experience. Interactive maps and evocative audio recordings add further complement the projects.

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We hope that you will download and enjoy this exciting new digital publication –

This digital exhibition catalogue ‘Document Scotland: The Ties That Bind’ is available for download for Android and iOS devices from Google Play and the App Store.

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A recent acquisition – St Andrews University archive

Sophie Gerrard's prints being signed for The University of St Andrews Special Collection

Sophie Gerrard’s signed prints from the series Tunnocks, and Drawn To The Land being prepared for The University of St Andrews Special Collection © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved

 

We delivered four lovely boxes of prints and a hard drive of digital files to St Andrews this week and are very pleased that Document Scotland’s work has now become one of the most recent acquisitions to the St Andrews University Special Collection.

Document Scotland started working with Marc Boulay and the University of St Andrews archive just over a year ago.  The University’s Special Collections Division holds over 800,000 images from the 1840s onwards and we are delighted and proud to have our prints and digital files now included in such an extensive, impressive and important collection of photography in Scotland.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert's prints from the series 'Life in The Third' being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s prints from the series ‘Life in The Third’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s prints from the series ‘Unsullied and Untarnished’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Stephen McLaren’s prints from the series ‘Scotia Nova’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Stephen McLaren's prints from the series 'Scotia Nova' being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Stephen McLaren’s prints from the series ‘Scotia Nova’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Colin McPherson's prints from the Scottish independence referendum being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Colin McPherson’s prints from the Scottish independence referendum being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

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Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland’s prints and digital files for the archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland's boxes of prints. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland’s boxes of prints and digital files for the archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

We’ve had the pleasure of working with the ever charming Marc Boulay and his team at the University over the last year or so. Thank you Marc for all your help, assistance, support and enthusiasm for our work.

 

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Fitba’ daft

Tartan Army goal celebrations in the Faroe Islands. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2007 all rights reserved.

Tartan Army goal celebrations in the Faroe Islands. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2007 all rights reserved.

 

To most right-thinking people, all it involves is 22 men (or women) chasing an inflated leather sphere around a grassy field in a pointless physical activity of no consequence. To the rest of us it’s an obsession: football, otherwise known as our national sport.

I’ve been bewitched by the sport since my dad took me to my first match, as a 10-year-old in November 1974. I remember little of the game itself, other than Hibs defeated Morton 5-0 and it was raining and I ate a Wagon Wheel. Since that day I’ve attended hundreds of matches, mostly as a spectator but also many in a professional capacity, commissioned to photograph everything from top international fixtures, to obscure matches at n0n-League grounds in places which are little more than a dot on the map.

View from The Rock of Dumbarton v Cowdenbeath. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2012 all rights reserved.

View from The Rock of Dumbarton v Cowdenbeath. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2012 all rights reserved.

 

For the last decade, I’ve worked on a monthly basis for a football publication whose roots stretch back to the intoxicating days of the 1980s, when a generation of activists began self-publishing fanzines on every subject from music, UFOs, cinema, fashion and football. And so it was that When Saturday Comes (WSC) magazine began life in 1986. Over the past almost 30 years it has grown to become a much-loved and respected feature of the soccer season. With a mix of irreverent humour and critical analysis debunking much of the hype of the modern day football industry, it has seen an army of contributors commentating on the game from their own unique standpoint. Many writers have gone on to make careers in mainstream journalism and the alumni from the WSC academy includes top columnists, celebrities and even a former cabinet minister.

Alloa Athletic take on Aberdeen in the shadow of the Ochils. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2010 all rights reserved.

Alloa Athletic take on Aberdeen in the shadow of the Ochils. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2010 all rights reserved.

 

As the magazine grew and developed, photography was added to the monthly offering. Each edition now carries two features which rely on images to make them work: the eponymous Match of the Month and Shot! – an often wry look at life behind the scenes at football clubs across the UK and beyond. Now, the entire collection of photography shot principally by the magazines’ four regular photographers has been put together into an archive of historical and contemporary images, which is launched officially this week.

Berwick's duel identity on display. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2014 all rights reserved.

Berwick’s duel identity on display. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2014 all rights reserved.

 

Each season WSC usually focuses on a number of stories from Scotland and it’s been me who is normally tasked with shooting features from my homeland. Most recent assignments have included the national team’s victory over the Republic of Ireland in a European Championship qualifying match at Celtic Park and a look at the duel identity of English-based Scottish League side Berwick Rangers, shot in the run up to the Independence referendum. Very different fixtures but a similar ethos and aesthetic when it comes to the approach and final edit of pictures.

Hibs fans look on as a gull looks the other way at easter Road. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2006 all rights reserved.

Hibs fans look on as a gull looks the other way at Easter Road. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2006 all rights reserved.

 

Whether its shooting an international match or something from the lower leagues, the brief is always the same: to present images which reflect the supporters’ experience of the games they attend. And while the magazine may be headquartered in London, its regular coverage of Scottish football has ensured an enduring and loyal readership north of the border.

Boiler suits and bouncers at Fraserburgh FC. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2010 all rights reserved.

Boiler suits and bouncers at Fraserburgh FC. Photo © Colin McPherson, 2010 all rights reserved.

 

This weekend I will once again be covering a match in Scotland, at one of the country’s most iconic and traditional stadiums. To find out where he will be, however, you’ll have to purchase the next edition of WSC, due out in early-March.

 

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‘Britannia Herself’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert

Rangers fans exiting Galabank Stadium, after the Annan FC v Rangers FC game, in Annan, Scotland, Saturday 23rd September 2012. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2012, all rights reserved.

 

It was the second Rangers away game I’d been to for my, at that time, new project ‘Life In The 3rd’. I wished to follow Rangers FC as they travelled around the country and through the Scottish footballing 3rd Division, taking in the small towns and lesser stadiums of the land. I’d just recently returned from ten years of living in Japan and this seemed like a good way to see the country and get back in amongst a good story to shoot.

The game at Annan was lacklustre, decent for photos, but the football was terrible. Low, laden grey skies weighed heavy on everyone within the small ground. My intention at these games was to photograph the fans and culture, I wasn’t too interested on what happened on the field itself. Annan’s Galabank Stadium was small enough you could move around, get access to different sections, go to where the pies were being sold out of a caravan, and generally find new angles. But during the game itself, as the pitch was so close to the fans, it wasn’t possible to move about, you had a location and you had to stay there. It was then, stuck in my one position for 45minutes, that I first saw the young lady above, wrapped in her flag, in amongst the Rangers traveling support.

She was standing, leaning on a terracing balustrade, wrapped in the Union Jack, and wearing heavy rimmed black glasses. I don’t remember how vociferous she was in her support of her team, or decrying their lack of fortitude that day, but next to her was another young lady of similar age. This second girl, a blonde, had a foul mouth on her, cursing the referee, the linesmen, the players, the football, no one escaped her wrath and cursive language. But it was the girl wrapped in the Union Jack who drew my attention. At that time I thought the two girls were pals together, but in subsequent games where I occasionally saw them, I came to realise they weren’t.

It was the start of a new project and it was interesting to me to see young ladies ardent in their support of Rangers, to see them as the hardcore traveling support. To photograph them fitted well with my aims, for myself, of exploring who makes up the support that follow Rangers at their lowest hour. I wanted to photograph the girl in the Union Jack, but I couldn’t get close as the game was in progress, and then it was over, nil nil.

I was outside the stadium photographing the fans streaming out, a moment I always enjoyed for photos. The fans would depart, criss crossing each other, some going left to cars, some right to the pub, others straight for their bus. There was always a certain energy about the crowds as they left, and it didn’t last long, a minute or two, but it was one of my favourite times of a game. The general mass of people all going in different directions always held the feeling of a battle scene.

And then, just as the crowds were thinning, it didn’t take long as the Ranger support was small in number for this game where Annan’s Galabank stadium can only hold under 3,000 fans in total, I caught sight of her. Miss Union Jack. She wasn’t carrying a trident and shield, nor wearing a Corinthian helmet, and her white robes had been swapped for her Union Jack, but there she was- Britannia personified. Britannia herself.

She was walking fast with some men, and I had to approach her, ask her if I could take her photo. I was surprised by her eagerness to stop, to do a photo. Being a photographer amongst the Rangers fans was sometimes met with suspicion and distrust, so her happiness to be photographed surprised me a little. She stood in the road, and took off her large black framed glasses, and glanced past me, her pale complexion and red lipstick perhaps slightly at odds with her stalwart expression. I shot a few frames, as others passed behind her, and around her. She never asked what the image was for, or for whom I was photographing. And then she was gone, the Union Jack still gathered tight around her shoulders. Rule Britannia.

 

Jeremy’s photograph, and others from his series, ‘Life In The 3rd‘, can be seen at Fotospace Gallery, Rothes Halls, Glenrothes, as part of the ‘Seeing Ourselves’ exhibition, which is curated by Document Scotland. The exhibition continues until August 1st 2013.
Document Scotland’s latest newspaper, which accompanies the exhibition, can be bought via our publications page.

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Life In The 3rd.

In all my years working as an editorial photographer in Scotland I always tried to stay away from shooting the obligatory football matches. It isn’t that I didn’t like football, or didn’t follow the results, just that I had no desire to sit and photograph football games on Saturday afternoons or on wet Wednesday nights. It wasn’t what I got into photography for. And then I relocated to Japan to work for a few years and I was ever further away from Scottish football, and every time I had to explain the Rangers Celtic rivalry, bigotry and hatred, I would feel glad that I was a few thousand miles away from it all. To hear the occasional result was enough. I didn’t have to live it or photograph it.

But then a funny ol’ thing happened. I moved back to Glasgow to live and work at the same time as Rangers FC began their new adventure, their new battle to climb the table, but this time in the Irn-Bru Third Division. The mighty ‘Gers, with their incredible club history stretching back to 1893, have this season found themselves at the bottom of the table, taken there not by their own bad results on the pitch, but by bad results in the boardroom and by years of financial mismanagement. And now they face a climb back to the top, with games away to exalted teams such as Elgin City, Berwick Rangers and Annan Athletic.

Scenes of Berwick Rangers supporters at the end of the 3rd Division football game of Berwick Rangers FC versus Glasgow Rangers FC, at Shielfield Park, Berwick-Upon-Tweed, England, on Sunday 26th August 2012. The final score was 1-1. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, 2012. All rights reserved.

 

A colleague in Tokyo and I discussed the Rangers story and it struck me that a year with Rangers in the 3rd division might just be perfect for me. I can immerse myself in all things Glaswegian, I can see the country, the landscapes and feel the raw fresh weather on my face, and of course the story is rich in material for photographs. It’ll be great to document, the fans, the stadiums, the culture of Scottish lower division football. And so it is I have embarked on a season of football. I find myself smirking as I contemplate buying a Rangers season ticket. I woke up yesterday, Tuesday, already wishing it were Saturday and there was a game on. I find myself saying “We’re away to Annan next week” and I’m not discussing a family weekend away to Annan.

The tear sheets below come from this week’s Der Spiegel German news magazine. My first assignment back in Scotland two weeks ago, and with huge fortune and fate, I was to accompany a sports writer and the story was to be Rangers in the 3rd division. The referee had just blown the whistle and signalled that I was onside. An omen perhaps, and a great start to my season of Life In The 3rd.

I’ll post more images as the season and project progresses, but for the time being here is the Der Speigel pages which had my images, and also a shot, above, from an away game to Berwick Rangers FC a week ago.

From Der Spiegel Magazine in Germany-  The magnificent trophy room at Ibrox Stadium, home to Rangers FC, Glasgow, Scotland. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved.

Der Spiegel magazine- Mr. Charles Green, investor and new owner of Rangers FC, Glasgow, Scotland. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, all rights reserved.

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