Graham MacIndoe – Coming Clean

Untitled from the series Coming Clean, negative: 2004-2010; printed 2015 by Graham MacIndoe (b.1963). © Graham MacIndoe

 

GRAHAM MACINDOE: COMING CLEAN
8 April – 5 November 2017
Scottish National Portrait Gallery
1 Queen Street, Edinburgh, EH2 1JD
Admission free
#GrahamMacIndoe

Powerful self-portraits depicting drug addiction of acclaimed Scottish photographer to be shown by National Galleries of Scotland

A compelling and powerful series of photographs that document an acclaimed Scottish photographer’s devastating descent into drug addiction are to be given an exclusive first public showing this spring at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery (SNPG).

Graham MacIndoe: Coming Clean will exhibit 25 personal and graphic images taken throughout the six-year period in which heroin and crack cocaine seized hold of successful New York-based photographer Graham MacIndoe (b.1963).

These hugely original photographs intimately record MacIndoe’s downward trajectory from professional photographer with a flourishing career to struggling opiate addict, a journey of anguish and isolation that was to culminate in an arrest for drug possession and a four-month stint in New York’s notorious Riker’s Island prison and five months in an American immigration detention centre before he got clean.

The images both powerfully confront the perilous destructiveness of addiction and explore the genre of self-portraiture in a way unrivalled in the photographic medium.

Graham MacIndoe studied painting at Edinburgh College of Art and received a Masters degree in photography at the Royal College of Art in London, before moving to New York in 1992 where he later pursued a career as a professional photographer. His work began to appear in some of the world’s leading publications, including The New York Times and The Guardian.

MacIndoe’s success led him to take portraits of the most recognisable people in the world, from Hollywood actors and authors to international artists and pop stars. However, he began to use alcohol and drugs in part to mitigate the stress arising from this demanding lifestyle, and also upheaval in his personal life, but his heroin habit gradually overtook everything that once mattered.

MacIndoe has now been clean for seven years, largely thanks to an innovative prison rehab program, what he describes as “a compassionate judge” and the support of his partner Susan Stellin, a reporter with whom he co-wrote Chancers: Addiction, Prison, Recovery, Love: One Couple’s Memoir, published by Random House in June 2016.

The recovery has seen MacIndoe prosper again, as a working photographer and as adjunct professor of photography at Parsons The New School in New York City, while he and Stellin were awarded a 2014 Alicia Patterson Foundation Fellowship for a project about deportation. In addition to being represented in the National Galleries of Scotland collection, his photographs also reside in the collections of The New York Public Library, The British Council, The V&A Museum, The Museum of Fine Arts, St Petersburg, Florida and The National Media Museum, Bradford.

While other photographers have shown the excesses of drug-taking in graphic detail before, the position usually adopted has been one of voyeur; not of subject. In MacIndoe’s case, his images do not show an individual exploited for a mass audience, so the power and control rests firmly with himself, and never before has a photographer captured addiction with such subjective honesty and rigour from the inside. This produced body of work is not only truly ground-breaking in its content, but in fact requires a certain degree of courage in viewing.

Coming Clean’s images are a result of a powerful interdependence between MacIndoe’s strong compulsions, the drive to capture the consequences of his addiction, and of his dexterous ability to do so.

The photographer hoped to avoid glamorising what had become “a solitary existence, the monotonous repetition of an addict’s daily life. I turned the camera on myself because I wanted to photograph addiction from the inside – a perspective most people never see”.

He admits that, “even in that haziness of addiction I was thinking like a photographer… how these pictures would be perceived”, and throughout this, his photographer’s eye remained keen and strong, even if everything else did not.

In their use of light, composition and ambiance, this eye emanates through Coming Clean’s images. Using basic digital cameras with self-timers, MacIndoe recorded himself while engaging in his personal drug rituals. His skilful use of light and shadow created a series of haunting self-portraits that reveal the squalor and stark reality of addiction.

Almost all the photographs are set within the small and limiting confines of his flat in Brooklyn. There is little connection with or evidence of the outside world and the few views of the city outside recorded from the window only seem to reinforce the isolating and claustrophobic existence. The only figure to appear in the scenes is MacIndoe himself, whose ghost-like presence is often exaggerated through the piercing light. In one portrait he is photographed against a window—turning his back literally and figuratively on the outside world—and the strong backlight has effectively distorted his body so that his head appears to float up and away.

Though no image, perhaps, is as symbolic of Coming Clean as that in which a clearly incapacitated MacIndoe rests his head on a seat, the evidence of a recent heroin injection in his contorted face and blood trickling from his forearm. Not only does MacIndoe, albeit inadvertently, frame the whole shot with his outstretched hand, but in his final action before descending into unconsciousness leaves the viewer with the understanding that amid the chaos, what he had been reaching out for was is the one thing he’d been left with any discernible control over; his camera.

Graham MacIndoe said: “It is a great honour to have the first showing of this body of work at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. Although the images were taken during a difficult time, I am grateful to have made it through that period and hope this series shows that recovery is possible even from the depths of serious addiction. I never anticipated that these photographs would find a place in the national collection, so I’m especially excited for the opportunity to exhibit them in the city where I first discovered photography”.

Annie Lyden, International Photography Curator at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, said: “These photographs offer a rare insight into a very real aspect of the human condition. Graham’s honesty and courage in documenting this particular moment of his life allows us to see the rawness and isolation of addiction from the inside. The images are powerful and are at times upsetting, but you will not find a more candid and revealing series of self-portraits than Graham MacIndoe’s Coming Clean photographs.”

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A night at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery

We are still buzzing after such an interesting, creative and energetic evening at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery last night for Document Scotland’s 1st ever portrait event “Face To Face: The Portrait in Photography Today”.

Crowds gathering before the Document Scotland photography event "Face To Face: The Portrait in Photography Today" at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery on May 14th 2014.

Crowds gathering before the event “Face To Face: The Portrait in Photography Today” at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery on May 14th 2014
image © Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

Thank you to the photographers which Document Scotland invited to take part along side us, Ben Roberts, Arpita Shah, Emily Macinnes and Graham MacIndoe. Thank you to Annie Lyden, the International Curator of Photography at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery, and her brilliant team for chairing and organising the event with us. Thank you to you the audience for coming along, for sending us your support from a distance if you were unable to make it, for following the events on Twitter, for being there, for helping to spread the word, for making it such a success and for your support of Document Scotland on our (relatively short but eventful) journey so far.

Here’s some images from the night, if any of you have any others which you’d like to share with us please do send them in – we’d love to see them.

Everyone takes their seats and we're ready to get started.  © Carly Shearer, SNPG 2014 all rights reserved

Everyone takes their seats and we’re ready to get started.
© Carly Shearer, SNPG 2014 all rights reserved

Sophie Gerrard shows her new on-going project, "Homecoming" at the Document Scotland photography event "Face To Face: The Portrait in Photography Today" at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery on May 14th 2014 Copyright © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Sophie Gerrard shows her new on-going project, “Homecoming”
© Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

The evening started off with Document Scotland’s Sophie Gerrard who showed new work, made over the last 18 months during Sophie’s return to Scotland. Sophie talked about re-aquainting herself with Scotland through portraiture – and spoke of the collaboration between sitter and photographer when making a portrait.

Sophie Gerrard showing "Homecoming"  © Emily Macinnes 2014 all rights reserved

Sophie Gerrard talks about portraits from the series “Homecoming”
© Emily Macinnes 2014 all rights reserved

 

Then we heard from Jeremy who talked us through his Roma portraits, his experiences of living and visiting the camps and later houses of those featured in the project, some individuals he met and re-photographed almost 10 years later. Jeremy also showed a short piece of film footage of him in the camp making his portraits.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert introducing the crowd to his Roma project © Colin MacPherson/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert introducing the crowd to his “Roma of Sinesti” work
© Colin McPherson/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert talks through portraits from his "Roma of Sintesti"   © Emily Macinnes 2014 all rights reserved

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert talks through portraits from his “Roma of Sintesti” project
© Emily Macinnes 2014 all rights reserved

 

Next up was Ben Roberts, who started by talking about some his influences, Chris Killip & Laura Pannack and then showed us images from the series ‘Higher Lands’, which Document Scotland featured as a portfolio on the website last year. He talked about his photographic process and approach to making the portraits and also about why they have remained such a popular body of work, raising the question that perhaps we all see a little of ourselves in these portraits.

Ben Roberts shows work from his project "Higher Lands" © Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Ben Roberts shows work from his project “Higher Lands”
© Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Ben Roberts shows work from his project "Higher Lands" © Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Ben Roberts shows work from his project “Higher Lands”
© Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

After Ben we watched a moving piece of multimedia by Graham MacIndoe documenting his journey through heroin and crack cocaine addiction. Graham’s images have been featured in The Guardian and other press lately and his decision to release such a personal body of work was something he talked about in the multimedia presentation he made for the evening.

Jeremy introducing Graham MacIndoe's work. © Colin McPherson/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Jeremy introducing Graham MacIndoe’s work.
© Colin McPherson/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Graham MacIndoe wasn't here on the night but we watched a moving multimedia presentation of "My Addiction, through My Eyes" © Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Graham MacIndoe wasn’t here on the night but we watched a moving multimedia presentation of “My Addiction, Through My Eyes”
© Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

The audience - a sold out show at the Document Scotland photography event "Face To Face: The Portrait in Photography Today" at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery on May 14th 2014 © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

The audience – a sold out show at the Document Scotland photography event “Face To Face: The Portrait in Photography Today” at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery on May 14th 2014
© Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

After the break first up was Colin McPherson with a lighter hearted look at his portraiture taken mostly from his 1 year journey along the border of Scotland with England. His presentation showed people he’d encountered along the way and those who had become part of the journey but who, in his words, remained strangers. He titled the collection “In the Company of Strangers”

Colin McPherson shows his work, "In The Company of Strangers"  © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Colin McPherson shows his work, “In The Company of Strangers”
© Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

Then we heard from Arpita Shah who took us through a several bodies of her work, and talked about the relationship between mythology and portraiture and how she uses it to explore the experience of Diaspora for Asians living in Scotland.

Arpita Shah talks about her work  © Emily Macinnes 2014 all rights reserved

Arpita Shah talks about her work
© Emily Macinnes 2014 all rights reserved

Arpita Shah talks about her work  © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved

Arpita Shah talks about her work
© Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved

 

Then it was Emily Macinnes who showed, for the 1st time her project “Paradise Lost: Testimonies of Abuse”, a powerful presentation of images and text documenting the thoughts and experiences of men who have suffered sexual abuse. A powerful and moving piece.

Emily Macinnes talks to the audience and shows her work "Paradise Lost: Testimonies of Abuse"  © Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Emily Macinnes talks to the audience and shows her work “Paradise Lost: Testimonies of Abuse”
© Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Emily Macinnes talks to the audience and shows her work "Paradise Lost: Testimonies of Abuse"  © Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Emily Macinnes talks to the audience and shows her work “Paradise Lost: Testimonies of Abuse”
© Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

Last, to finish the night was  Stephen McLaren’s work who’s series of portraits of Americans in California was introduced by Annie Lyden and left us all with the sound of bagpipes in our ears – and a smile on our faces.

 

Stephen McLaren's photographs from "American Always, Scottish Forever"  © Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

Stephen McLaren’s photographs from “American Always, Scottish Forever”
© Sophie Gerrard/Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

All the photographers on stage for the Q&A with Anne Lyden, International Photography Curator at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery (l-r) Anne Lyden, Emily Macinnes, Arpita Shah, Ben Roberts, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Sophie Gerrard & Colin McPherson © Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

All the photographers on stage for the Q&A with Anne Lyden, International Photography Curator at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery (l-r) Anne Lyden, Emily Macinnes, Arpita Shah, Ben Roberts, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Sophie Gerrard & Colin McPherson
© Document Scotland 2014 all rights reserved

 

 

 

 

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Face to Face: The Photographers

So folks, we are now very excited to confirm the following details about the work being presented at our event Face To Face: The Portrait In Photography Today at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery on the 14th May 2014.

Colin McPherson will present a short multimedia entitled ‘In the Company of Strangers’ in which he will explore the relationship between the photographer and the subject involved in making portraits. The photographs will reflect encounters Colin has had with people he had previously never met, and examine what happened next.

SNPG_McPherson

Jehovah’s Witnesses, Coldstream, 2014, from the series ‘In the Company of Strangers’
Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert will present work from his project ‘Satra, the Roma of Sintesti’ which spanned 17 years. Through repeated visits to the Roma camp in Romania, relationships were built, friendships formed and a portrait of a camp captured in both black-and-white and colour, charting the changes in the lives of the people.

SNPG_SuttonHibbert

Mia, a young Roma girl. From the series ‘Satra, the Roma of Sintesti’
Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

Sophie Gerrard will present portraits from her personal and on-going series ‘Homecoming‘, a project focused on the experience of turning the camera towards the places, people and communities which evoke a particular sense of home. Shot all over Scotland, Sophie will talk about the notion of returning home, and share her experience of photographing those people and places which can feel simultaneously familiar and unknown.

SNPG_Gerrard3

Boys at the skate park. From the series ‘Homecoming’
Photograph © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.

 

‘American Always, Scottish Forever’, is a series of portraits Stephen McLaren has been making of Americans with Scottish ancestry who retain close affinity with the ‘Old Country’. Stephen discovered the subjects at the many Scottish Festivals and Highland Games that take place throughout California and even through they may never set foot in Scotland, all revel in having a Scottish identity to call their own.

SNPG_McLaren

Jonathan McGregor, Piper, Ventura Highland Games, California, 2012 from the series ‘American Always, Scottish Forever’.
Photograph © Stephen McLaren 2014 all rights reserved.

 

We are very pleased to be joined on the evening by a selection of guest photographers who will be showing the following work…

Emily Macinnes will be showing her current, long-term project ‘Paradise Lost: Testimonies of Abuse‘ documenting male survivors of childhood, sexual abuse. Emily will show images from the portrait series and discuss how she approached this sensitive subject matter.

SNPG_Macinnes

From the series ‘Paradise Lost: Testimonies of Abuse’
Photograph © Emily Macinnes 2014, all rights reserved.

Emily Macinnes (b. 1989) is a Scottish-born photographer currently based in Edinburgh.  Since graduating from Nottingham Trent University in 2012 she has been working as a freelance documentary photographer and multimedia storyteller working with international NGO’s as well as more intimate stories of struggles faced closer to home.  What unites her work is a common interest in peoples’ stories and a desire to creatively communicate the individual and emotional aspect of the issues she documents.

 

The multimedia presentation of Graham MacIndoe‘s  self portrait series ‘My Addiction, Through My Eyes’ will show a selection of images from a much larger body of work. Although often harrowing, the images show the quietness and isolation that often comes with the obsessive nature of addiction when the partying days have long been left behind. Without glamorization or being sensationalist there is an awareness of pain and a quality of introspection rarely seen with this subject matter.

SNPG_MacIndoe

Self portrait from the series ‘My Addiction, Through My Eyes’..
Photograph © Graham MacIndoe 2014 all rights reserved.

Graham MacIndoe studied painting at Edinburgh College of Art and went on to earn his master’s degree in photography at the Royal College of Art in London. He has lived in New York City since 1991 where he has been a part time  professor at Parsons The New School since 2011. He is having his first book published by LittleBigMan Books in June 2014 and is the recipient of a 2014 Alicia Patterson Fellowship. His work is in many public and private collections including Scotland’s National Portrait Gallery, the British Museum of Film and Television, the V&A Museum in London and the British Council. Graham is represented by Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles.

 

Arpita Shah will be presenting a short narrated slideshow entitled ‘Myth and The Asian Diaspora’. She will be discussing the relationship between mythology and portraiture in her work and how she uses it to explore the experience of Diaspora for Asians living in Scotland.

SNPG_Shah

From the series ‘Myth and The Asian Diaspora’.
Photograph © Arpita Shah 2014, all rights reserved.

Arpita Shah is an India-born visual artist and is based in Scotland. With a background in photography and film, she predominantly works in these two mediums exploring themes around culture and identity. Her work tends to draw from Asian and Eastern mythology, using it both visually and conceptually to explore the issues of cultural displacement in the Asian Diaspora. Arpita has exhibited internationally and has been involved in several artist residencies and community arts project around Scotland, which include residencies at Street Level Photoworks, Ankur Arts and The Albert Drive Project.

 

Ben Roberts will be showing work from his series ‘Higher Lands’, photographed in 2007-08. The photographs, documenting adolescents growing up in the Highlands of Scotland, still resonate with people 7 years after they were taken. Exploring themes of love and insecurity, Ben will discuss why photographs of teenagers are so compelling, and how he is striving to make similar images in his current personal work.

SNPG_Roberts

From the series ‘Love, Desire and Insecurity – Portraits of Adolescence’
Photograph © Ben Roberts 2014, all rights reserved.

Ben Roberts is a portrait and documentary photographer based in Madrid. He is a contributor to the FT Weekend Magazine and Monocle amongst other publications. His personal projects are diverse, ranging from observing the effects of the economic crisis on the landscapes of Spain, through to young people growing up in the Highlands of Scotland.

 

We look forward to seeing you there on the night.

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Face to Face: The Portrait in Photography Today

Document Scotland are very happy to have been invited to host ‘Face To Face: The Portrait in Photography Today‘  an evening of portraiture, conversation and photography  on Wednesday 14th May at The Scottish National Portrait Gallery.

You can expect a lively evening featuring work by the four members of Document Scotland as well as special guest photographers; Arpita Shah, Ben Roberts, Graham MacIndoe and Emily MacInnes. The evening will be chaired by Annie Lyden, International Photography Curator at The National Galleries of Scotland.

Doors open at 7pm, allowing you a chance to look around The Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2013 before proceedings begin at 7:30pm.

We very much hope you can join us – please book your tickets through the Eventbrite page here

and we look forward to seeing you!

FACETOFACELeafletFinalv2

 

 

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My Addiction, My Photographs

‘My Addiction, My Photographs’, by Graham MacIndoe

Over the past few years Scottish-born photographer Graham MacIndoe has been on what you could call a ‘character building’ trip. From the highs of a successful career in advertising photography to the highs of a serious drug addiction, and the inevitable descent into a world he never thought he’d find himself.

But tenacious as always in pursuit of an image Graham kept photographing in this new world of crime, drugs and self-destruction that he found himself in. Finally a brush with the law was inevitable, and Graham was incarcerated, facing deportation from the USA, his home of two decades. But luck and goodwill was on his side, and now, still in the USA, clean of drugs, and back stronger than ever Graham is using his photography and experiences to try to educate about the perils of drug addiction, to open conversation, to help others who may find themselves in similar predicaments. And he is doing that by showing the incredible self-portrait series of images he took during his own years in the grip of heroin and crack.

Welcome back Graham!

-Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert.

 

© Graham MacIndoe 2014, all rights reserved

© Graham MacIndoe 2014, all rights reserved

 

Some of Graham MacIndoe’s work can be seen here on the New York Magazine, with a very fascinating and educational Questions and Answer between Graham and his girlfriend Susan.

Recently Graham and Susan also appeared on Huffington Post Live TV  (watch a 15min interview) to discuss the work, and the problems faced by drug addicts and their loved ones.

Graham MacIndoe (right) on HuffPostLive.

Graham MacIndoe (right) on HuffPostLive.

 

Visit Graham MacIndoe’s website to see further images from the drug years, to see his collection of bags that the drugs were sold in. ‘Sin City’, ‘Get Fucked Up’, ‘Bazooka’, and ‘Wake Up’, only some of the trade names used by drug dealers as they peddle their wares.

Drug bags. © Graham MacIndoe 2014, all rights reserved.

Drug bags. © Graham MacIndoe 2014, all rights reserved.

 

The above drug bag images were recently exhibited in Miami, and will form part of the content of a book of the whole project that Graham is currently working on with a designer and publisher.

Graham MacIndoe can be reached on twitter, or via his website.

 

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The UnAmericans: Detained, Deported and Divided

Congratulations are due to New York-based Scottish photographer Graham MacIndoe and his partner, journalist Susan Stellin, on being awarded an Alicia Patterson Foundation grant for their project ‘The UnAmericans: Detained, Deported and Divided’.

The UnAmericans: Detained, Deported and Divided

The project is a series of interviews and photographs documenting the stories of immigrants who have been ordered to be deported from the United States, as well as their family members – often, American citizens – who suffer the consequences of the harsh punishment of exile. These stories illustrate the wide range of people locked up while caught up in deportation proceedings: not just individuals who crossed the border illegally, but asylum seekers, legal permanent residents, and immigrants trapped in the bureaucracy of adjusting a visa. – Graham MacIndoe & Susan Stellin.

Fatoumata - Husband Deported whilst seeking Asylum. Bronx, NYC. 2013 ©Graham MacIndoe 2013, all rights reserved.

Fatoumata – Husband Deported whilst seeking Asylum. Bronx, NYC. 2013 ©Graham MacIndoe 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Philippine Immigrant takes Sanctuary in Church after removal order, 2013. ©Graham MacIndoe 2013, all rights reserved.

Philippine Immigrant takes Sanctuary in Church after removal order, 2013. ©Graham MacIndoe 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Dante's Immigration Check In Papers. 2013. ©Graham MacIndoe 2013, all rights reserved.

Dante’s Immigration Check In Papers. 2013. ©Graham MacIndoe 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Click here to view more work from the  series of Graham MacIndoe’s photography project The UnAmericans. And please send, via Twitter, your congratulations to Susan and Graham on their award!

 

The annual fellowships are designed to foster independent in-depth reporting on national and international affairs. The Alicia Patterson Foundation fellowship program for journalists was established in 1965 in memory of Alicia Patterson, who was editor and publisher of Newsday for nearly twenty-three years before her death in 1963.

The Fellows are awarded $40,000 for a 12-month grant and $20,000 for a six-month grant.

The new Fellows will spend their fellowship months traveling, researching, and writing articles on their projects for the APF REPORTER, a quarterly web magazine published by the Foundation. Every year, the Fellows’ articles and photo essays are widely distributed through newspapers, news services, magazines, and websites worldwide. Fellows’ work often is published jointly with their “home” news outlet and has resulted in many national awards.

The winners were selected through a highly competitive process of screening by two panels of judges, as well as submitting detailed proposals, examples of past work, and references.

More than 320 reporters, editors, and photographers have won Alicia Patterson fellowships since the foundation was established in 1965 to honor the former publisher of Newsday.

 

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