Frank McElhinney

Frank McElhinney’s work first came to our attention in 2014 when he won first place at that year’s Jill Todd Award for his intriguing, unique aerial photographs. Since then this prolific artist has gone from strength to strength, creating several bodies of work focussing on Scotland’s landscape and how it relates to our country’s past, both near and distant. One of these, Adrift, is currently on display at Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, as part of Tabula Rasa II. Here, he speaks to Sarah about his projects, processes, themes and methods.

Adrift: Learable, Sutherland (2016) © Frank McElhinney all rights reserved

SAF: Frank, you graduated from the Glasgow School of Art in 2014. Can you tell us a bit about how you got into photography? What were you doing before you became a student?

FM: After working in manufacturing for 20 years I decided out of the blue to become an artist. I attended several different night classes whilst building up a portfolio for entry into art school. So it’s a rather mundane answer I’m afraid, but I got into photography through adult education courses at Glasgow City College and GSA.

SAF: Your degree show plans were forced to change when the Mackintosh building caught fire in May 2014 – can you explain how this affected your work?

FM: Yes, it was a bit of a shock at the time. I’d spent over three years working on a project about the Battle of Bannockburn whose 700th anniversary was to coincide with the degree show that never happened. The main affect on my own work was the instillation of a great sense of urgency around production. Three days after the fire I went to the source of the River Forth at Loch Chon and began making a series of kite aerial photographs that won first prize in the Jill Todd Photography Award. The drive towards constant production has stayed with me.

Fire in the Mack, Friday the 23rd of May (2014) © Frank McElhinney all rights reserved

SAF: Speaking of the work you entered into the Jill Todd competition, how did you come to use the kite for making your photographs? Were there any technical challenges to this approach?

FM: Using the kite came from the need to make one specific picture. At the Battle of Bannockburn thousands of people drowned in the burn and the River Forth. I wanted to photograph the confluence of these two bodies of water from above and the kite was the simplest way to achieve that perspective. The kite is literally a joy to work with. The only challenge is the wind itself. Too much gusting and the kite will crash, not enough and a long journey might be wasted.

False Start, Limitless Ending: Confluence of Kelty Water and River Forth (2014) © Frank McElhinney all rights reserved

SAF: Your recent work, Adrift, also uses aerial photography – this time, to respond to the current migration crisis with reference to areas of Scotland once inhabited by subsistence farmers. The link is an oblique rather than an obvious one – can you tell us more about your process with this project and how you decided which locations to concentrate on?

FM: Even sympathetic media coverage of today’s migration crisis often represents refugees in problematic ways. I chose not to photograph people at all but to look instead at migration through the lens of Scottish history. The Scottish diaspora has affected all parts of the country but I focused on abandoned settlements in the Highlands and Islands. I was inspired by the early work of Tom Devine who described how the Highland Clearances were underpinned by ethnic inferiorisation of the Gaels and resulted in an almost complete cultural erasure. Whilst working on a previous project I’d also been struck by the fact that even today, of the 45 most populous cities and towns in Scotland only four of them appear on the northern side of the map.

SAF: Your work creates interesting visual conversations between past and present – responding to current events while illuminating Scotland’s history. You mention a previous project – 45 Sun Pictures in Scotland, for which you used another type of alternative photographic process – pinhole photography. Can you tell us a little about how that work came about?

FM: In September 2014, I was on a month long residency in Cromarty. At the beginning I held a workshop for local people where we made pinhole cameras, filled them up with photographic paper and tied them on lampposts and trees around the village. At the end of the month we retrieved and scanned the images that had been burned into the paper. Looking at those abstract ‘solargraphs’ with the sun tracking across the sky, I reflected that the fate of the entire nation was being decided during the exposures. Within a few days of the referendum on independence it was clear nothing had been settled, the country was still pregnant with change. Solargraphs seemed an appropriate way of saying something about that unexpected situation. So I made 200 pinhole cameras and installed them around Scotland’s 45 most populous cities and towns. I made a picture of Scotland that was, in the end, woefully incomplete.

45 Sun Pictures in Scotland: Dundee (2014-2015) © Frank McElhinney all rights reserved

SAF: It’s almost as if, through your practice, you’re creating alternative geographical surveys of the land – linking the physical terrain to more abstract ideas about identity and nationhood, with reference to events both recent and ancient. There are definite strands running through your work, though the subject matter changes. What projects do you have planned for 2017?

FM: When I look at the land I see history and I think about how I can use history to address contemporary issues, (such as nationhood, conflict and migration), rather than simply represent historic events or the land itself. I like your description ‘alternative geographical surveys of the land’, but at the same time I am also making alternative histories that connect with the present.

Looking ahead I have two new exhibitions in development for 2017 and 2018. The first relates once again to migration but looks even further back in time to the old Roman border between Caledonia and Britannia, the Antonine wall – this will be shown at the Auld Kirk Museum, Kirkintilloch, in April and May 2017. The second project is a collaboration with John Farrell, whom I met at art school. John and I were born and raised in Lanarkshire a few miles apart, and that’s where the project is based. Our working title is Coal, Steel and Earth. I am focusing on Kingshill Nature Park, formerly the site of a pit where my maternal grandfather worked as a coal miner. John is focused on what remains of Ravenscraig steelworks, where coincidentally my paternal grandfather worked as a platelayer. The exhibition is provisionally planned for 2018, at Summerlee Museum of Scottish Industrial Life. Beyond these immediate projects I have a few ‘slow burners’ including that lost project that claims me every time I drive up the A91 past Stirling and look out over the long loop of the burn as it flows into the Forth. I used to think that the moment for Remembering Bannockburn had gone up in smoke forever, but there is still work to be done out there.

Coal, Steel and Earth: Kingshill trench and tree (2016) © Frank McElhinney all rights reserved

 

Remembering Bannockburn: Confluence of Bannockburn and River Forth (2014) © Frank McElhinney all rights reserved

 

Thank you for taking the time to speak to us, Frank. We’re really excited to see where your work takes you!

Adrift is currently on display as part of Tabula Rasa II, Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, until 4th February.

 

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A recent acquisition – St Andrews University archive

Sophie Gerrard's prints being signed for The University of St Andrews Special Collection

Sophie Gerrard’s signed prints from the series Tunnocks, and Drawn To The Land being prepared for The University of St Andrews Special Collection © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved

 

We delivered four lovely boxes of prints and a hard drive of digital files to St Andrews this week and are very pleased that Document Scotland’s work has now become one of the most recent acquisitions to the St Andrews University Special Collection.

Document Scotland started working with Marc Boulay and the University of St Andrews archive just over a year ago.  The University’s Special Collections Division holds over 800,000 images from the 1840s onwards and we are delighted and proud to have our prints and digital files now included in such an extensive, impressive and important collection of photography in Scotland.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert's prints from the series 'Life in The Third' being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s prints from the series ‘Life in The Third’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s prints from the series ‘Unsullied and Untarnished’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Stephen McLaren’s prints from the series ‘Scotia Nova’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Stephen McLaren's prints from the series 'Scotia Nova' being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Stephen McLaren’s prints from the series ‘Scotia Nova’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Colin McPherson's prints from the Scottish independence referendum being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Colin McPherson’s prints from the Scottish independence referendum being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

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Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland’s prints and digital files for the archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland's boxes of prints. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland’s boxes of prints and digital files for the archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

We’ve had the pleasure of working with the ever charming Marc Boulay and his team at the University over the last year or so. Thank you Marc for all your help, assistance, support and enthusiasm for our work.

 

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Histrionics in Stirling

The Scots army pose for pictures. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

The Scots army pose for pictures. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

If not the quite centre of the universe, Stirling felt like the place to be in Scotland this weekend.

 

A Scottish soldier looks for a fight. Photograph ¸Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

A Scottish soldier looks for a fight. Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

 

England's King Edward II awaits the battle. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

England’s King Edward II awaits the battle. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

On Friday evening, Pipefest kicked three days of festivities, with around 1600 pipers and other musicians from around the world marching from the castle through the city’s streets. The following day, Bannockburn Live competed for attention with Armed Forces Day, the latter having been somewhat controversially arranged to coincide with the commemoration of local hero Robert the Bruce’s epic victory over the English army on a boggy field in the year 1314.

 

A family feud gets resolved. Photograph ¸Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

A family feud gets resolved. Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

 

An English soldier is dragged out of the arena. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

An English soldier is sent homewards, tae think again. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

Document Scotland photographers Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert and Colin McPherson joined the throng as a sell-out crowd of 20,000 made their way to Bannockburn for two days of music, entertainment and re-enactments, the backdrop of which was to commemorate the battle and to show a bit of partizan patriotism.

 

Grubs up, 14th century style. Photograph ¸Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

Grub’s up, 14th century style. Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

 

An impromptu umbrella. Photograph ¸Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

An impromptu umbrella. Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

 

Clans gathering at Bannockburn Live. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

Clans gathering at Bannockburn Live. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

 

The event itself reflected many aspects of Scotland: rather than a sombre commemoration honouring the dead, the tone of the re-enacted battle scenes were sometimes irreverent and inadvertently humourous. Informative, colourful and at times bloodthirsty yes, but also laced with a healthy dose of sarcasm and surrealism. Meanwhile outside the main arena, the 14th century had been lovingly recreated by an assortment of characters fashioning weapons, cooking gruel and making clothes.

 

The Scots show their deadly shilterns. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

The Scots show their deadly shilterns. Photograph © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.

 

Robert the Bruce and Alex Salmond come face-to-face. Photograph by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

Robert the Bruce and Alex Salmond come face-to-face. Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014, all rights reserved.

 

With visitors from every corner of the Scottish diaspora in attendance, it took every inch of famed Scots resolve to remain cheerful despite the rain. The weather on the Saturday was more evil than medieval, but the crowds endured it, mindful no doubt that their suffering was pitiful in comparison to that of the soldiers and their families on that fateful day seven centuries ago. In the end, souvenirs were purchased, pints sunk and a few songs sung and the crowds shuffled off for another 700 years.

Two modern-day Scottish warriors. Photograph © Simon Roberts 2014, all rights reserved.

Two modern-day Scottish warriors. Photograph © Simon Roberts 2014, all rights reserved.

 

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Lewis Legacy

The family of John MacKay with his wife Anne (born Morrison), 20 South Shawbost, circa 1900-1905.
Photograph © Proiseact Tormod an t-Seoladair, 2013, all rights reserved.

An afternoon of talks and photographs will take place today at the Old School Community Centre at Shawbost on the island of Lewis to celebrate the life of Dr Norman Morrison (Tormod an t-Seoladair), whose pre-World War I photographs of life in the area are being presented in public for the first time.

Dr Morrison (1869-1949) had a long an interesting life; he completed a short spell of education in a so-called blackhouse school, but despite this rose to prominence as the co-founder of the Scottish Police Federation, a pioneer in herpetology in Scotland, an author on books on history and folklore as well as gaining a reputation as a fine glass-plate photographer.

Dr Norman Morrison in police uniform, circa 1905 holding an adder.
Photograph © Proiseact Tormod an t-Seoladair, 2013, all rights reserved.

Now, a one-day symposium (open to the public tickets on the door) celebrating the many facets of Dr Norman Morrison’s work accompanied, for the first time ever by a public display in Shawbost of the striking photographs that have inspired this initiative. A variety of invited expert speakers will give talks on the many achievements of Tormod an t-Seoladair.

Comann Eachdraidh an Taobh Siar were gifted the intellectual copyright over copies of these negatives by the descendants of Dr Norman Morrison, and intends to appreciate and explore Dr Morrison’s legacy through reproduction of the images and collaborative projects in the community. Roddy Morrison, Chairman of the Westside Historical Society said, “This discovery lifts a curtain, allowing us to look at an unseen chapter of our past.”

Kate Macleod of 21 North Shawbost and her father’s sister in bed, Shawbost, Lewis, circa 1900-13.
Photograph © Proiseact Tormod an t-Seoladair, 2013, all rights reserved.

The negatives are historically invaluable, unique in content and previously unknown; they skilfully show groups of villagers and individuals posed in the local landscape. The photographs have merited national and local interest from the Scottish National Galleries and CNES’s Tasglann project, in addition to being a source of fascination for the local community.

These images are significant and unique in portraying community life in the early 20th century. Photographer Murdo Macleod, who was born and brought up in Shawbost and has been invaluable in bringing this project forward, commented, “The photographs, whilst fascinating in themselves, are also a missing piece in the photographic heritage of the Hebrides – predating Paul Strand’s Hebridean work by up to fifty years and standing in stark contrast to the output of George Washington Wilson.”

Dr Norman Morrison in police uniform, undated.
Photograph © Proiseact Tormod an t-Seoladair, 2013, all rights reserved.

A lasting legacy from Dr Norman Morrison will remain in the community for future generations through photographic archives and the production of a DVD recording, documenting community inter-generational walks, observing and listening to the history of the area in partnership with Iomairt Ghaidhlig Iar Thuath Leodhais.

Dr Morrison will also be the subject of an hour long documentary to be produced by Corcadal Productions for BBC Alba.

Catherine Maclennan (1827-1912) of 44 North Shawbost, Lewis, circa 1905-12.
Photograph © Proiseact Tormod an t-Seoladair, 2013, all rights reserved.

Further information can be found at the Proiseact Tormod an t-Seoladair website or on their Facebook page.

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