Wildfires: Somewhere Ahead I See You

To mark the Year of Young People 2018, WildFires presents three bodies of work by women who explore the whole – and varied – truths of what it is to be young, entering the tender places of their subjects’ private terrains, from where they form themselves and address the world. Flannery O’Kafka documents the profound physicality and mystery of heredity, while Sarah Amy Fishlock examines her father’s life after death in her own mind and in the images that remain of him. Kirsty Mackay’s new work examines the photographer’s own roots, the longing and sense of belonging to the place where she grew up – Glasgow.

image © Flannery O’Kafka 2017 from the series Thin Blood / Thick Water

Somewhere Ahead I See You is a resonant celebration of youth, its fluid and decisive moments, its fleeting darknesses and deep joys.

June 11th – July 21st 2018
FLOW Photofest Gallery Wall
Eden Court, Inverness IV3, UK
Did you like this? Share it:

PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES.

PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES: TRANSPORTATION PHOTOGRAPHS

FROM THE NATIONAL GALLERIES OF SCOTLAND 
2 June 2018 – 13 January 2019
Scottish National Portrait Gallery
1 Queen Street, Edinburgh EH2 1JD
0131 624 6200 | Admission FREE
#PlanesAndTrains

Part of Edinburgh Art Festival 2018

The extraordinary advances in the technology of travel over the past 170 years, and their wide-ranging impact on our lives will be the subject of a dramatic and inspiring new exhibition of photographs at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery (SNPG) this summer. Planes, Trains and Automobiles will draw upon the outstanding collection of the National Galleries of Scotland to consider the rapid expansion of transportation from the end of the Industrial Revolution to the present day. It will feature 70 exceptional images, including key images by Alfred G Buckham and Alfred Stieglitz, which demonstrate how the technologies of photography and transport have evolved in tandem, each of them broadening our horizons and radically altering our perception of our ever-shrinking world.

The exhibition will include iconic photographs such as The Steerage, a career-defining image by the American photographer Alfred Stieglitz (1864-1946), made in 1907, while he was travelling to Europe by sea; and Inge Morath’s striking portrait Mrs Eveleigh Nash, The Mall, London (1953). Walking on the first-class deck, Stieglitz looked down into the third-class steerage area below him. Immediately struck by the strength of the composition created by the group of travellers gathered there, he quickly retrieved his camera, and captured the jarring class divide. Celebrated both for its modernist composition and its social commentary, the resulting photograph is one of the most recognisable images in the history of photography. Similarly, Morath (1923-2002), one of the first female photographers to work for renowned photo agency Magnum, used the door frame of an open-topped car to artfully divide her composition, suggesting the social gulf between the wealthy Mrs Nash and her chauffeur.

One of aerial photography’s pioneers was Alfred G Buckham (1879-1956) who took breath-taking photographs in the skies above Edinburgh. Just as fascinating as his photographs, are Buckham’s dare-devil techniques to capture the perfect shot. He gave this sage advice to budding aerial photographers: ‘It is essential to stand up, not only to make the exposures but to see what is coming along ahead. If one’s right leg is tied to the seat with a scarf or a piece of rope, it is possible to work in perfect security’. Buckham also pioneered early layering of multiple negatives to create the perfect shot giving his photographs an ethereal, otherworldly quality.

The Industrial Revolution led to the rapid expansion of the railways, which had a huge impact on the way that people lived and worked and led to the expansion of many towns and cities. As early as 1845, the railway line in Linlithgow was photographed by David Octavius Hill (1802-70) and Robert Adamson (1821-48), who travelled by train to document the main sights of the town.

The Forth Bridge was the longest bridge in the world when it opened in 1890 and it is now widely regarded as a symbol of Scottish innovation and cultural identity. Radical in style, materials and scale, it marked an important milestone in bridge design and construction during the period when railways came to dominate long-distance land travel. Evelyn George Carey (1858-1932), a young engineer working on the construction of the bridge, made an incredible series of photographs as the building work progressed. In one of these photographs Carey records the amusing sight of two men demonstrating the cantilever principle – resulting in the boy sitting at the centre of the ‘bridge’ being lifted into the air. This series of photographs inspired the German contemporary photographer Dieter Appelt (b.1935) to make Forth Bridge – Cinema. Metric Space – a photographic montage of 312 separate silver gelatine prints which together offer a beautiful, lyrical interpretation of an engineering masterpiece.

Another innovation explored in Planes, Trains and Automobiles is the Victorian phenomenon of the stereograph. Made of two nearly identical scenes, which when viewed together in a special device, create a single three-dimensional image; this new photographic technology essentially mimicked how we see the world. It sparked curiosity and encouraged the public to view images of far-flung places from the comfort of their own home. The natural association between travel and transport meant that modes of transport were one of the most popular themes for stereographs. This exhibition will feature over 100 stereographs from the National Galleries of Scotland’s collection in a dynamic wall display, alongside digital interpretations.

524 million journeys were made by public transport in Scotland last year and Planes, Trains and Automobilesexplores this common form of travel. Photographers have been repeatedly drawn to the theme of commuting, fascinated by its ability to show humanity in movement, following regulated routes to work. Among these are documentary photographers Humphrey Spender (1910-2005) and Larry Herman (b.1942) who both made work observing Glasgow and Glasweigians on their daily commute.

From photographs of the iconic Forth Bridge to images of commuting, Planes, Trains and Automobiles is a photographic celebration of transportation in all its forms.

Christopher Baker, Director, European and Scottish Art and Portraiture, National Galleries of Scotland, said:  This is the third in a hugely popular series of thematic exhibitions drawn entirely from the outstanding collection of photography held by the National Galleries of Scotland. The carefully selected photographs on display show how technology and transport have impacted on so many aspects of our lives and provided such a rich and thought-provoking focus for outstanding Scottish and international photographers, from very earliest days of the medium to today’s innovators.”

Did you like this? Share it:

MacKinnon Collection

Pictured: Fairlie Album, 1860s by various inc. Julia Margaret Cameron. Collection: National Galleries of Scotland, MacKinnon Collection, acquired jointly with the National Library of Scotland with assistance from the Heritage Lottery Fund, Scottish Government and Art Fund.

 

100 years of Scottish photography secured for the nation

An exceptional collection of historic photographs that captures a century of life in Scotland is to be shared with the public following a special collaboration between the National Library of Scotland and the National Galleries of Scotland.

More than 14,000 images – dating from the earliest days of photography in the 1840s through to the 1940s – have been jointly acquired with support from the Scottish Government, the Heritage Lottery Fund and Art Fund.

The collection covers an expansive range of subjects – including family portraits, working life, street scenes, sporting pursuits, shops, trams, tenements, mountains and monuments. Until now, it was one of the last great collections of Scottish photography still in private hands.

The collection was put together by photography enthusiast Murray MacKinnon, who established a successful chain of film-processing stores in the 1980s, starting from his pharmacy in Dyce, near Aberdeen.

He said: “The collection covers the day-to-day lives of Scottish people both rich and poor, the work they carried out including fishing and farming, in order to survive, and their social life including sport and leisure. These were turbulent times what with industrialisation, shipbuilding, new forms of transport, the social upheaval caused by the First World War in Europe and the Boer War in South Africa. The discovery of penicillin and radiography heralded the development of medicine and the pharmaceutical industry in Scotland.

“I would like to thank all the people involved in acquiring this collection for the Scottish nation, and for their great efforts in making this acquisition possible.”

Culture Secretary Fiona Hyslop welcomed the public acquisition.

She said “The MacKinnon collection is one of the most remarkable collections of Scottish photography and an invaluable resource for researchers, students and the wider public. I am delighted that £300,000 of Scottish Government funding has supported the acquisition, curation, touring and digitisation of this collection, preventing it from being broken up or sold overseas.

“Our rich cultural and artistic heritage plays an intrinsic part in boosting our economy and tackling inequalities. I commend the National Galleries of Scotland and National Library of Scotland for their achievement in ensuring that this unique collection can now be enjoyed by the people of Scotland, enabling the public to learn more about our fascinating early photography tradition.”

National Librarian, Dr John Scally said: “Scotland has a unique relationship with photography which dates back to the work of the early pioneers such as Hill and Adamson. This acquisition is akin to buying Scotland’s photographic album of 14,000 pictures and bringing it home, and together with the National Galleries of Scotland, we were determined to make that happen. I am confident that every Scot will feel a connection with these wonderful photographs and we look forward to sharing them with the public over the coming months.”

National Galleries of Scotland, Director General Sir John Leighton, said: “This collection superbly demonstrates the important role Scotland had in shaping the history of photography. Our ability to tell this story is greatly enriched by this acquisition, and we look forward to the exciting partnership with the National Library of Scotland in making these artworks accessible to all.”

Heritage Lottery Fund, Manager for Scotland, Lucy Casot, said: “Taken in the pioneering days of photography in Scotland, these historical images allow us to glimpse our ancestors going about their daily lives. Thanks to players of the National Lottery, this valuable resource has been secured for us all to enjoy. It’s a fascinating collection detailing what life was like and how that has shaped us as a nation.”

Director of Art Fund, Stephen Deuchar said: “We are proud to be able to support both National Library of Scotland and National Galleries of Scotland in acquiring Murray MacKinnon’s unparalleled collection for the nation. It is incredible to have these photographs join a public collection where they can be enjoyed for generations to come through their display and tours as well as digitally.”

The photographs provide a visual record of how Scotland has changed physically, socially and economically since the 1840s.

Highlights include:

More than 600 original photographs from the pioneering days of photography featuring work from David Octavius Hill (1802-1870) and Robert Adamson (1821-1848), James Ross (d.1878) and John Thomson (d.1881), Cosmo Innes (1798-1874) and Horatio Ross (1801-1886).

Some of the finest work of Thomas Annan (1829-1887) and his son, James Craig Annan (1864-1946) including rare examples of their original albumen prints.

Fine examples of the work of Scotland’s successful commercial photographers including George Washington Wilson (1823-1893) and James Valentine (1815-1880).

Portraits of Scottish regiments from the Crimean War by Roger Fenton (1819-1869).

A series of albums and prints depicting life in the main towns and cities from the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Studies of farming and fishing communities in remote villages and hamlets.

Scenes of shipbuilding, railways, herring fishing, weaving, whisky distilling, dockyards, slate quarries and other working environments.

The collection contains an exquisite view of Loch Katrine by William Henry Fox Talbot, who travelled to Scotland in the autumn of 1844. Talbot was the inventor of the calotype, a negative-positive paper process that was patented around the world, but, importantly not in Scotland, allowing for free use and experimentation. As a result, early Scottish photographers, such as Hill and Adamson and Ross and Thomson, were encouraged to take up the new technology, becoming key figures in developing its potential as both document and art form within its first two decades.

As the photographic medium evolved, Scotland once again was at the forefront when, in 1883, Thomas Annan and his son James Craig Annan secured the British rights for the previously secret process of photogravure. The photomechanical process created prints in large editions, revolutionising the publication and reach of photography.

While photography is known for its reproducibility, many of the artworks contained within the collection are unique, including daguerreotype portraits and hand-made albums. One such impressive example is the Fairlie album, consisting of family portraits and photographs by known makers including Julia Margaret Cameron. Using elements of collage, drawing and marginalia, the pages are a one-of-a-kind celebration of the Fairlie Family, from Fife. Reginald Fairlie was the architect of the National Library of Scotland building on George IV Bridge.

A major exhibition of the MacKinnon collection will be held at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery next year, with touring exhibitions around the country to follow. The entire collection will also be digitised over the next three years and made available online.

#ScotlandsPhotos

Did you like this? Share it:

“No Ruined Stone” by Paul Duke

(c) Paul Duke

Paul Duke’s new book of photography, No Ruined Stone, reminds us that the places in which we grow up rarely leave us, they exert a pull across the decades and often force us in later life to re-examine how we have become the person we are today.

Muirhouse, built in the 1950s as a council estate to the west of Edinburgh has had a troubled recent history with substandard high-rise housing, chronic unemployment and endemic drug use among many of its younger residents creating seemingly intractable social problems. It has also had a reputation for strong community spirit and looking after its own as Scottish legends and former Muirhouse residents, Gordon Strachan and Irvine Welsh, can attest to. Photographer, Paul Duke, also grew-up in Muirhouse, and although he left to study and then work in London, family roots have repeatedly drawn him back and recently he decided that photography was the ideal way to re-connect with the community that dominated his childhood years.

In, No Ruined Stone, Paul’s black and white landscapes and portrait photographs are enigmatic and loaded with the kind of symbolism that only someone with a deep and complex knowledge of Muirhouse could achieve. Long-overdue re-development of the housing stock is re-shaping the estates and the clash between undergoing construction and the natural world that tenaciously clings on around these zones provides many of the strongest images in the book. Locals, who Paul encounters in and around the neighborhood, are photographed as they are found, the exchange seems natural and there is little attempt made to heroise.

To find out more about this new body of work, Document Scotland asked Paul to elaborate on the impetus for returning to Muirhouse to shoot the photographs which make up No Ruined Stone.

(c) Paul Duke

DocScot: Tell us about your history with Muirhouse? How has it changed since your early days there?

PD: I was raised in Muirhouse and lived there for the first eighteen-years of my life. Despite the fact that poor social conditions made it a very tough place to grow up, I had a very happy and loving childhood there. My formative years were greatly shaped by a strong maternal influence and two inspiring and very brilliant young art teachers at school, Richard White and Maldwyn Stride. My mother brought up two boys on her own, it wasn’t easy for her emotionally nor financially, but she was determined to keep us out of trouble and instilled in us both, strong moral values. My brother, like me, went onto study at the Royal College of Art in London – that meant everything to her, to break the mould of expectation for young men from a deprived Scottish housing estate.

My father moved back close to the area some time after my mother left, so I returned fairly frequently to visit him. I still have relatives who live in the area to this day.

The physical change has been significant – my house, school and a big chunk of the original Muirhouse estate have been razed to the ground as part of an urban regeneration scheme. However, many of the social ills that dogged the area back in my early days are still unfortunately prevalent.

DocScot: When and how did the idea come to you to take a series of photos? Were you focussed on what you wanted to achieve or were you just seeing what you saw?

PD: I knew during the making of the ‘At Sea’ project that I wanted to return to Scotland to make more work. Both my parents passed away around that period of time therefore it felt timely to continue to explore my own Scottish identity as well as this notion of national identity, which interests me greatly.

There was a strong pull to go back to my roots and I knew from the beginning that I wanted to make a body of work that celebrated the fighting spirit, dignity and hope of the residents living there today – I was very focused on that but always kept my eyes open. I made the project over two years so it was a very organic and intuitive experience. Working with a large format camera slowed down the process of making photographs – this was intentional. I also wanted to play with the visual language, to create a narrative that struck the balance between objective documentary and a subjective project.

(c) Paul Duke

DocScot: How did you explain to interested observers what you were upto?

PD: Muirhouse is a small close-knit community and word gets around quickly. I made early visits to walk around and meet people before I started making any photographs. After that, I made regular monthly visits and never missed a trip over the whole period of making the project – it was really important to be consistent. Residents therefore got used to seeing me around, trust and familiarity followed. The warmth, kindness and support I experienced when I explained what I was doing, was humbling.

DocScot: Was it important to shoot in overcast or non-summer weather?

PD: The most important thing was to always keep things free. I never allowed myself to get caught-up in lighting preference as I had no control over that – everything was shot with natural light. I made the most of the light I had to work with on any given day and enjoyed the challenge.

DocScot: How did the book come about?

Last year, I approached German photo book publisher, Hartmann Books. Markus Hartmann was previously director of photography at Hatje-Cantz before setting up his own publishing company. Markus was raised in Berlin and I think the photographs and subsequent social message I had created struck a personal chord with him. Markus and his team were therefore very keen to publish the series.

DocScot: What kind of future do you think Muirhouse has and are you likely to have any role in that?

PD: In terms of the residents, yes, Muirhouse has a good future. I had the great privilege to make friends with a handful of dynamic, committed and inspiring community activists. If developers and politicians consult these individuals and others like them over the course of time, then I am confident that Muirhouse will successfully deal with the pressing social inequities that exist, but only with their consultation.

I have no immediate plans to take on any active role but I have expressed some future involvement. However, I do hope in the interim that the content of the book highlights social inequity, challenges deep-rooted class prejudice and offers a far-reaching insight into a deprived and disenfranchised community.

(c) Paul Duke

DocScot: What you are up to in the short-medium term and how is your photographic practice developing.

PD: I am currently developing a new project, again based in Scotland. It’s still in the germination period so not a lot to expand on at this stage, but I do hope to start shooting in earnest this coming September. This project will form the third and final part of a trilogy of works exploring modern day Scotland.

Many thanks to Paul for the interview and for sharing his work. The book, No Ruined Stone, is published by Hartmann Projects and can be bought here…http://www.hartmannprojects.com/publications/paul-duke-publication

(c) Paul Duke

(c) Paul Duke

(c) Paul Duke

Did you like this? Share it:

10 From The North | 10 bho Tuath – an An Lanntair exhibition

Did you like this? Share it:

Paul Walton’s ‘Hum’, reviewed by Frank McElhinney

This week I attended the opening of Paul Walton’s Hum, which runs until 9th February in an exhibition space on the 5th floor of Glasgow University’s St. Andrew’s building. I have been an admirer of Paul’s work for a number of years, and was impressed to see this collection of over 70 hand printed silver gelatin prints, brought together as Hum: Dispatch from the Lower Anthropocene. Walton, an ecologist and environmental campaigner by profession, uses photography to break down distinctions between science and art and explore a personal understanding of the human place in nature, of the history of life, and of environmental processes. The exhibition is reviewed here by Frank McElhinney, another contemporary Scottish artist whose work we have long admired, and has himself been interviewed for this blog (link below).

Hum: Dispatch from the Lower Anthropocene – an exhibition of photographs by Paul Walton

5:29am July 16th 1945, the precise moment of the first detonation of a nuclear weapon and, Paul Walton proposes, the commencement of the Anthropocene. It is this release of radionuclides imprinting directly upon geology that marks the crossing of the line into a new epoch when human impact on the environment becomes the defining characteristic of the period we currently live in.

In his exhibition of more than seventy hand made silver gelatin prints, Walton shares with the viewer his silent, slow burning rage. Cobwebbed daddy long legs and snail feeding trails, coexist alongside distressed plastics and metals. All show traces of decay and whether organic or manmade all are imperceptibly dusted with radioactive isotopes, touched by the cold winds blowing in from Siberia. All are strikingly presented in threes – triptychs, little trinities, the Trinity test, Jornada del Muerto desert, New Mexico 5:29am July 16th 1945.

Mabel Barber’s marine plankton, © Paul Walton 2017

In justified rage there is also a glimmer of hope. The hope that others will see what the photographer sees if his vision is communicated well enough. Photographs are anchored in stillness. Paul Walton’s photographs ask us to stop and think about time and humanity, to think about our place as aberrant species on this planet. If we see what he sees, that the Anthropocene is upon us, then surely we will change in ways that might yet stop the rot? That is one proposition or heartfelt plea of the work. And how much work, how much labour is vested in these photographs? This exhibition is Walton’s first but he has spent five years worth of weekends in the darkroom of Street Level Photoworks in Glasgow, slowly accumulating and developing the skills and the imagery to construct this rich multilayered narrative. This exhibition shows us his vision of the contemporary, precariously poised between the blind march toward End time and a conscious step away from the precipice.

Crane fly, © Paul Walton 2017

Re-photographed archival images are presented alongside new and unusual still lives that were made throughout Scotland. A nuclear blast in the Nevada desert, Paleolithic cave drawn men from Spain, and microscopic slides of marine plankton originally made by a woman who was run over by a coal truck on her bicycle after ten weeks of marriage to the photographers father. These vie for attention with sea torn aluminium from Seil, beached plastic on Tiree, bullet riddled steel plate from Perthshire and spilt milk in the Gorbals. Still life triptychs are bounded on a very long wall by grids of snagged carrier bags, little archaeologies of detritus flying in the wind like torn flags of forgotten nations. The perceived physical feat of production in such volume also plays its role in expressing the maker’s obsession with his subject. The viewer responds to the material reality encountered as well as to the visual aesthetic of the closely observed inter-connected still lives.

Slug feeding trails, © Paul Walton 2017

Hum: a low steady continuous sound. Jornada del Muerto: journey of the dead man. In a talk given at the exhibition opening Walton spoke about the influence of his late geologist father on his world-view, his obsessions and indirectly his photography. He spoke of his own professional interest in declining sea bird species and tracing root causes back through the food chain to the impact of global warming on marine plankton. Climate change and the power games humans play with nature hum, ever present, weaving their way into the fabric of our lives through our environment and eventually into our bodies themselves. Walton’s quiet photographs signal a mortal struggle. He remembers as a boy more than forty years ago, standing on a hill with his father, being inspired by stories of the wide-open plains of Siberia. This was a space of freedom and ‘fresh air’. Air that blows across Europe from the east, air that carries low level radiation: “he and I breathed in the cooling soviet isotopes, gyred in from Siberian test sites, down into our bellies, and there they stay, as geology hums, shrugs like the eider, and a new epoch begins.”

 – Frank McElhinney

Hum: Dispatch from the Lower Anthropocene  is on display at St Andrew’s building (5th floor), Eldon St, University of Glasgow, until February 9th. Mon – Thur 7.30 – 21.00, Fri 7.30 – 17.30.

Frank McElhinney was interviewed by Sarah in January 2017 – read the feature here.

Did you like this? Share it:

Photography Courses in Scotland

Document Scotland photographer Colin McPherson will be once again running a series of photography courses this summer.

Based on the tiny car-free island of Easdale, 15 miles south of Oban, Colin and fellow photographer, Liverpool-based Adam Lee, will host the short residential courses, where photographers of all levels will be guided and assisted to create a small photo story about the island, its environment and people.

The course is designed to ‘re-set’ your creativity by looking at some ideas which can help to bind a series of images into one coherant narrative. Both Colin and Adam will draw on their own experiences to deliver a stimulating and fascinating insight into how participants can improve and finesse their work. The emphasis will be on collaboration amongst the six participants, who will be accommodated in two cottages on the island, both of which boast all the comforts of modernity with the historical charm of this former slate-mining island in Argyll. There is ample time to devote to each individual and their photography whilst sharing and exchanging ideas and suggestions amongst the group.

Each course lasts two-and-a-half days, with three nights accommodation and all meals included in the fee. There are six dates starting at the end of June and into July, 2018 and anyone interested is encouraged to book early as places on the courses are already starting to fill up.

Full and further information can be found on the courses dedicated website.

All photographs © Colin McPherson, 2018.

 

 

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Colin Templeton’s Glasgow.

Photographer of Glasgow, Colin Templeton, is exhibiting work in a group show Photography Now, at the Brick Lane Gallery in London, from 8th – 20th November. There’s an opening night on the 8th Nov, 6.00- 8.30pm.

 

Rear Window – A face glimpsed through the steamed up window of a car. © Colin Templeton 2017

 

Of the work he’ll exhibit Colin says, “The city is in constant flux. Right now in Glasgow the shipyard cranes and tower blocks are vanishing. The pubs are closing or becoming gentrified. Everything disappears and, once gone, becomes fascinating.

I’ve come to realise that the city is my inspiration to pick up a camera. It seems to me that the fabric of the buildings and places are the perfect backdrop for the people. There is darkness and drama in the most everyday places, and I enjoy the challenge of finding and capturing it.”

 

Red Road – Final days of the Red Road flats. © Colin Templeton 2017

Did you like this? Share it:

Going with the Flow

The inaugural Flow Photography Festival took place across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland in September 2017 with the theme ‘People and Place’. The festival launched at Eden Court Theatre in Inverness, with several other galleries hosting work by internationally-acclaimed and award-winning photographers from Iceland, Finland, Scotland and Norway, icluding work by three Document Scotland photographers. In addition, the festival staged a series of concurrent events throughout the North of Scotland and the larger collections have just begun a tour of other venues. The man behind the festival, Matt Sillars, looks back on their first festival foray…

“As I write the main exhibitions from the inaugural photography festival in the Highlands and Islands are all bubble wrapped and packed in storage. However, An Lanntair in Stornoway, St Fergus Gallery in Wick and Timespan Gallery in Helmsdale all have shows with longer finish dates, so there is plenty to see well into November. The festival has been a real success with a set of  comment books burgeoning with positivity!

After two years planning the FLOW Photofest launched in September with a host of exhibitions from some of the leading photographers in the North including work by three Document Scotland members. Work from ‘When Saturday Comes’ by Colin McPherson and ‘North Sea Fishing’ by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert was on show along with the St Andrews University exhibit ‘Scotland through the Lens – 175 years of documentary photography’ featuring work by Sophie Gerrard. It was a real pleasure being able to show school groups the work of Sophie and discuss the photography of Franki Raffles, who was also in the 175 years show, in the context of contemporary documentary work.

Designed as a biennial destination festival, showing in galleries and spaces across the Highlands and Islands, FLOW has set itself the task of showcasing challenging and exciting photography by photographers ‘from the North’, ‘based in the North’ or ‘making work in the North’.  We featured work by 19 photographers – Ragnar Axelsson and Sigga Ella (Iceland), Iiu Susiraja  (Finland), Andrea Gjestvang and Tonje Boe Birkland (Norway), Dominique Gais (France), Mat Hay, Kieran Dodds, Alex Boyd, Chris Friel, Evija Laiviņa, Tom Kidd, Robin Gilanders, Ross Gilmore, Colin McPherson, Jeremey Sutton-Hibbert, Mary Overmeer, Nicky Bird, Kevin Percival (all Scotland) and the St Andrews University Special Collection exhibit. We also featured the work of a rediscovered Inverness photographer from the 1930s, Andrew Paterson.

Talks and workshops featured Alicia Bruce and the Paterson Collection while the over subscribed portfolio review sessions were conducted by Malcolm Dickson. Katherine Parhar and James Pfaff. These were very well received and we hope will be a regular feature. A series of films on Photographers were shown and photogravure workshops were held by Highland Print Studio. This was all finished off by a ‘small walls trail’ featuring local shops and unusual walls.

Most importantly the festival organisation had a real collegiate feel with everyone involved coming on board with enthusiasm and commitment, from the Highland Council, who saw real merit in the ‘cityness’ of such a festival to the photographers who all contributed their work, at times, in the case of Andrea and Kieran, making new work for our festival.

We are now in the process of developing the positive links established and working towards a ‘curated’ gallery wall dedicated to photography in Inverness.  Quite soon there will be the opening of a Community Darkroom in Inverness and this, allied to the exhibition space, will see the profile of photography becoming more established in the North.

Our next official outing will be September 2019 – across the Highlands and Islands. Please come and see what we will have on show!”

Title image: The Faroe Islands. Photograph © Andrea Gjestvang, 2017 all rights reserved.

The Andrew Paterson Collection at Inverness College UHI.

 

Sigga Ella Title Wall at IMAG.

 

North Sea Fishing. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, 2017 all rights reserved.

 

Ragnar Axelsson and Tom Kidd Eden Court Theatre, Inverness.

 

Adam, Heather Burn. © Matt Hay, 2017 all rights reserved.

 

Kieran Dodds with Gingers at IMAG.

 

Evija Laivina’s Beauty Warriors at Eden Court Theatre, Inverness.

 

‘Fraserburgh, 2010’. © Colin McPherson, 2017 all rightsreserved.

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Sarah Amy Fishlock / CBUK Creative Workshops

In recent weeks Sarah Amy Fishlock has been working on a series of workshops with the Glasgow branch of the UK charity Child Bereavement UK, based in Maryhill. Devised in close collaboration with the organisation, the workshops coincide with the first meetings of the Glasgow Young People’s Advisory Group, modelled on the existing setup in branches south of the border. These meetings encourage young people aged 11-25 to work together in a supportive environment, using their own experiences to work on projects focussing on ways to help themselves and other young people who are grieving. Throughout September 2017, Sarah worked on a range of collaborative creative activities with the young people and CBUK staff, using photography, collage and zine-making techniques to both explore the process of grief and build resilience and self-care skills in the here and now.

© Sarah Amy Fishlock 2017, all rights reserved

© Sarah Amy Fishlock 2017, all rights reserved.

© Sarah Amy Fishlock 2017, all rights reserved.

© Sarah Amy Fishlock 2017, all rights reserved.

© Sarah Amy Fishlock 2017, all rights reserved

© Sarah Amy Fishlock 2017, all rights reserved.

 

Child Bereavement UK supports families and educates professionals when a baby or child of any age dies or is dying, or when a child is facing bereavement.

Did you like this? Share it:

Behind the Scenes, University of St Andrews

Recently as a group we were delighted to be invited to spend time at the University of St Andrews, taking a look at what goes on behind the scenes, seeing the little moments which make the historic educational establishment run on a daily basis. From gardeners to waiting staff, from members of staff to the choirs and students themselves, little glimpses of  daily life are being captured building into a larger set which will in time we hope be exhibited or published. But for now the chronicling of the corridors of education in St Andrews continues…

 

Heather Bremner cleans Younger Hall, prior to the installation ceremony of Professor Sally Mapstone as Principal and Vice-Chancellor – Behind the scenes at the University of St. Andrews. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2016, all rights reserved.

 

Preparations for a ceremonial dinner at Lower College Hall – Behind the scenes at the University of St. Andrews. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2016, all rights reserved.

 

The ceremonial Macebearers take the ancient and valuable mace’s from the safe, in the Vestry of St Salvator’s Chapel, prior to the installation ceremony of Professor Sally Mapstone as Principal and Vice-Chancellor – Behind the scenes at the University of St. Andrews. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2016, all rights reserved.

 

Students having gowns adjusted after coming off stage at the Younger Hall at the University of St. Andrews, on graduation day, 30th November, 2016. ©Colin McPherson, 2016, all rights reserved.

 

Bell ringers at St. Salvator’s Chapel at the University of St. Andrews, on graduation day, 30th November, 2016. ©Colin McPherson, 2016, all rights reserved.

 

Newly graduated students at St. Salvator’s Chapel grounds at the University of St. Andrews, on graduation day, 30th November, 2016. ©Colin McPherson, 2016, all rights reserved.

 

Adam Taylor and his team of gardeners from the Estates, Grounds and Recycling Services carry out some spring time planting in the garden at Edgecliff House. This year they have planted over 11,000 tulip bulbs and 2000 crocus bulbs around the campus. Behind the scenes at The University of St Andrews, 30th March 2017. ©Sophie Gerrard 2017, all rights reserved.

 

Dame Anne Pringle, Senior Governor of The University of St Andrews University, April 2017. Photographed at University House – the Principle’s Residence at the University of St Andrews.
For the first time in the history of The University of St Andrews four of the senior positions are now held by women (Principal, Senior Governor, Rector and Student President). ©Sophie Gerrard 2017, all rights reserved.

 

Charlotte Andrew, President of the Students’ Association, St Andrews University, April 2017. Photographed at University House – the Principle’s Residence at the University of St Andrews.
For the first time in the history of The University of St Andrews four of the senior positions are now held by women (Principal, Senior Governor, Rector and Student President). ©Sophie Gerrard 2017, all rights reserved.

 

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Here We Are, by Burberry

Here We Are, an exhibition of over 200 photographs of British documentary work by 30 photographers, including work from Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s North Sea Fishing series, has gone on show in London, until 1st October. The show is curated by Christopher Bailey, President and Chief Creative Officer, Burberry; Lucy Kumara Moore, writer, curator and Director of Claire de Rouen; and co-curated by photographer Alasdair McLellan.

 

Burberry ‘Here We Are’ British documentary photography show at Old Sessions House, in London.

 

HERE WE ARE – EXHIBITION OVERVIEW
A major photography exhibition exploring the British way of life and character on display at Burberry’s new show venue, Old Sessions House.
* ‘Here We Are’ will bring together the work of over 30 of the 20th century’s most celebrated social and documentary photographers, from 18 September – 1 October 2017.

 

‘Here We Are’, by Burberry. Credit: Burberry. 

 

* The exhibition will be displayed over three floors of Burberry’s new show venue Old Sessions House in Clerkenwell, which will open to the public for the first time since its restoration.
* The exhibition will feature over 200 works and will be divided into themes which reflect different aspects of the British way of life.

* The exhibition will showcase important bodies of work by individual photographers as discrete, monographic presentations, alongside the thematic displays.

* Inspired by the spirit captured in British social portraiture, Burberry’s September collection for men and women will be presented at Old Sessions House on Saturday 16 September at 7pm.
Exhibiting photographers – ‘Here We Are’ will feature over 200 works by over 30 photographers including Alasdair McLellan, Andy Sewell, Armet Francis, Bill Brandt, Brian Griffin, Charlie Phillips, Chris Steele-Perkins, Colin Jones, Colin O’Brien, Dafydd Jones, Daniel Meadows, Homer Sykes, Ian Berry, Ian Macdonald, Ian Tyas, Jane Bown, Janette Beckman, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Jo Spence, Karen Knorr, Ken Russell, Mark Power, Martin Parr, Olivier Richon, Peter Marlow, Roger Mayne, Shirley Baker, Stuart Franklin, Tessa Traeger, Tom Wood and Tony Ray-Jones.

More information and further interviews and work from the show can be explored via the Burberry App for smartphones.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert being interviewed about his work, at the Burberry ‘Here We Are’ British documentary photography show at Old Sessions House, in London.

‘Here We Are’
18 September – 1 October 2017
10am-9pm daily
Old Sessions House, 22 Clerkenwell Green
Free entry

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING & EVENTS
In addition to ‘Here We Are’, we will run a varied programme of events and activities and will include temporary versions of Burberry’s all-day café Thomas’s and a Claire De Rouen book shop.
We are endeavoring to curate a programme of events in collaboration with exhibiting photographers and key creative partners which will respond to key themes of the exhibition. Drawing upon the specific expertise of each partner, the programme will include a rich and varied selection of talks, tours, workshops, conversations and book signings. Visitors will be able to sign up to the public programmes and events via Burberry.com.

OLD SESSIONS HOUSE
This September, Burberry’s show will be taking place at a new venue, Old Sessions House in Clerkenwell. The space will be opening its doors to the public for the first time since its restoration. As well as being the home to the ‘Here We Are’ exhibition, the venue will run a programme of events and activities and will include temporary versions of Burberry’s all-day café Thomas’s and a Claire de Rouen bookshop. Old Sessions House will be open daily, from 10am–9pm, 18 September – 1 October 2017. Old Sessions House is an 18th-century Grade II* listed building, for which construction started in 1779. It opened for use in 1782 as Middlesex Sessions House and was once the largest courthouse in England. With an architecture that has attracted attention from artists and topographers over the years, the building is Palladian in style, with a facade constructed in Portland stone and an interior featuring a grand coffered dome at its centre. Visit www.theoldsessionshouse.com for further information.

 

 

Did you like this? Share it: