The Beautiful Game

Edinburgh City versus Spartans. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

Edinburgh City versus Spartans. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

 

One of the most pleasing spin-offs from the launch of our show at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery has been the blizzard of positive press coverage for the show.

Added to this, the BBC commissioned and made a short film about Colin McPherson’s work, which has been released on the corporation’s website today. Focusing on the images from When Saturday Comes, filmmaker Dan Curtis spent last weekend interviewing Colin in the gallery and then following him around as he photographed local club Edinburgh City as they hosted Spartans FC in a match at the Commonwealth Stadium.

 

The Grandstand at Meadowbank Stadium. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

The Grandstand at Meadowbank Stadium. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

 

The film identifies what Colin looks for when photographing football and combines stills from The Ties That Bind with the images captured during last Saturday’s game.

 

Happy Edinburgh City players. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

Happy Edinburgh City players. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 2015 all rights reserved.

 

The film is intended for broadcast on the BBC terrestrial television, so you might get a chance to see it on programmes across the network at some point very soon. And in case you wondered, City defeated Spartans 1-0!

 

Colin and Document Scotland would like to thank Dan Curtis for making the film, Edinburgh City FC for being such generous hosts and the staff at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery for facilitating the filming.

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Going The Distance

Going The Distance is a Street Level Photoworks organised open show and features, amongst others, the work by Document Scotland’s Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, from his projects ‘Park Run’ and ‘Life In The 3rd’.

“Sport, like art, is a universal language, it is part of our everyday lives, and a feature of our society’s diverse cultural life, involving people of all abilities and backgrounds. This exhibition was coordinated to mark the Commonwealth Games in Scotland and celebrates the exceptional and the commonplace in sport. It will tour to other regional venues in Scotland in late 2014 + 2015 as a Games Legacy exhibition.” – Street Level.

The show venues, and partcipating photographers are as follows, as well as all work being shown from 13th October – 16th November at Eastwood Park Gallery, Giffnock.

1211

 

A reception was held today at the Harbour Arts Centre to launch the show with talks by photographer Keith Ingham and also Jeremy.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert's work on show.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s work on show.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert's work from his Rangers FC series 'Life In The 3rd' on show.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s work from his Rangers FC series ‘Life In The 3rd’ on show.

 

Robin Mitchell's 'Into The Blue - Portrait Series of Bowlers'.

Robin Mitchell’s ‘Into The Blue – Portrait Series of Bowlers’.

 

Keith Ingham tells the story of his work.

Keith Ingham tells the story of his work.

 

Keith Ingham tells the story of his work.

Keith Ingham tells the story of his work.

 

Jane Stockdale's work from the Brazil World Cup.

Jane Stockdale’s work from the Brazil World Cup.

 

Malcolm Dickson (centre) of Street Level Photoworks introduces the show.

Malcolm Dickson (centre) of Street Level Photoworks introduces the show.

 

photo 5

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Easdale’s World Stone Skimming Championships

Last week, the island of Easdale was in the news about a threat to a world-class sporting event held on its square mile of craggy slate anchored off the Argyll coast. Apparently the island’s owner wanted to cancel the island’s premier sporting event of the season, the World Stone Skimming Championships, for not providing a large sum of money to indemnify him against any claims leading from the event. Thankfully a  last-minute deal was brokered and so  I decided to go along and see what these elite athletes from the stone skimming world were up to.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

 

The World Stone Skimming Championships began in earnest in 1997 and were founded by the Eilean Eisdeal (The Easdale Island Community Development Group) as a fundraising event. The island’s now-abandoned slate quarry makes it the obvious place to hold a world championship in this field and after some canny marketing and healthy PR, contestants now hail from around the world and the event attracts over 300 participants.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

The rules of the World Stone Skimming Championships are rigourous. Stones must be no more than 3 inches in diameter and formed of Easdale slate. The stone must bounce no less than 3 times and skims are judged on the distance thrown rather than the number of bounces.

The competition is split into Ladies, Men, Junior Boys and Girls and Under 10s Boys and Girls categories. There is also the Old Tosser section for senior stone skimmers.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

This year’s event seemed to benefit from the news attention it received in the preceding week and the cliffs surrounding the quarry were jammed full of participants, their supporters and curious punters like myself. The quarry’s walls resounded with throaty cheers and the bellowing of stern officials. It got me thinking that odd, and faintly ridiculous events like these, are a clever way for small Scottish communities to open their arms to tourists and raise a few bob from a new generation of outdoor sporting trials. The world’s first crazy golf tournament, set in some entrepreneurial Scottish seaside town, must surely be on the horizon.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

Easdale Island image © Stephen McLaren 2012 all rights reserved.

 

 

Did you like this? Share it:

Doomen and Dookits

Young Scottish photographer Robert Ormerod has had his ‘Doomen’ series, a project of portraits of pigeon keepers, published in The Guardian Weekend magazine. The images comprise a beautiful set of portraits, quiet moments of the men and women with their pigeons, a breed of pigeon known as Horseman Thief Pouters.

The images were shot in the east of the country, in the Edinburgh area, and show the men and women who keep their pigeons and use them to capture or entice back to their huts the pigeons of other keepers. The pigeons, an attractive breed, and sometimes made more beautiful through having their feathers dyed peroxide blonde, are released in the hope that another pigeon will find them attractive, follow them back to their hut, where the pigeon keeper, or Dooman, will sling the net and capture the new pigeon. It is then theirs. This article by Guardian writer Simon Hattenstone explains the pigeon story nicely.

The spread as it appeared in The Guardian Weekend Magazine:

Robert Ormerod’s ‘Doomen’, The Guardian Weekend Magazine, Sept 2012.

 

Robert Ormerod’s ‘Doomen’, The Guardian Weekend Magazine, Sept 2012.

 

Robert Ormerod’s ‘Doomen’, The Guardian Weekend Magazine, Sept 2012.

 

Robert Ormerod’s ‘Doomen’, The Guardian Weekend Magazine, Sept 2012.

 

Click here to see larger images from Robert Ormerod’s ‘Doomen’ series, and to see Robert Ormerod’s photography website.

And here on Document Scotland photographer Stephen McLaren has posted his photographs of Dookits, the huts built in gardens and wasteland of Glasgow, by pigeon keepers, to house their prized Doo’s, or pigeons. Click here to see Stephen McLaren’s photographs of Dookits.

 

Did you like this? Share it: