‘Gravitas’ at London Art Fair

We’re delighted that Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s ‘Unsullied And Untarnished’ project, which examines the culture of the Common Riding festivals of the Scottish Borders, has been chosen to be included in the Photo50 show at London Art Fair which runs this week from Wednesday 18th – Sunday 22nd January.

Photo50 is London Art Fair’s annual exhibition of contemporary photography, providing a critical form for examining some of the most distinctive elements of current photographic practice. 2017’s installment is ‘Gravitas‘, a group exhibition of lens-based works, curated by Christiane Monarchi, editor of Photomonitor photography website.

Also from Scotland and included in the show are works from a new portrait project by Wendy McMurdo which examines the dual existence of children and their digital online worlds.

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“‘Gravitas’ refers to one of the core personal virtues taken by ancient Roman society as an important part of the expression of a purposeful life, a facet of the ideal and well-rounded citizen. It denoted depth as well as a seriousness and solemnity of character. The presence of gravitas signalled the transition of the Roman youth from the ranks of boyhood to become a respected member of society.

Artistic representation of the interior world of children and adolescents as they enter the adult world is fraught with challenges: not least the existence of taboos regarding the portrayal of children in the media under the age of consent. However, at a time when childhood itself comes under increasing pressure from society in many real and virtual arenas, the path through adolescence constitutes a fascinating journey worth illuminating for both artistic and sociological discourse.” – Christiane Monarchi explains the exhibition.

 

Ethan McMurdo as monk, St. Ronan’s games festival, Innerleithen, Scotland on 19th July 2014.

 

Jeremy will be exhibiting portraits of youths (above) participating in the Common Riding festivals from his Unsullied And Untarnished project, photographic portraits of the people of the towns of the Scottish Borders who each year undertake the maintaining of tradition, commemorating their local history and strengthening the bonds of their communities, during the annual Common Riding festivals of the summer months. Braw Lassies and Honest Lads, Left Hand Lassies and Right Hand Men, Cornets, Hunters and Coldstreamers – all titles given to the upstanding youths who lead the festivities, and whose duty it is to carry the burgh or town standard around the common lands, to “bring it back unsullied and untarnished”.

Wendy McMurdo’s work focuses on the now ubiquitous role of the computer in the lives of the majority of western children. The rapid proliferation of computers in schools has provided the context for the development of much of her work, which looks directly at the influence of computers on early years education. Working closely with local schools, she has explored the role of the child within the school, the growth of the Internet and the development of networked play. In related projects, she shadowed school parties on educational visits to various local museums, a process which evolved naturally from photographing in the classroom. From this, she produced series of works that explored the ways in which children related to the museum and its objects in a world of increasing simulation. She is based in Edinburgh.

Young Girl (iii), photo © Wendy McMurdo 2016.

 

Talking of the project Wendy says, “In the summer of this year, my youngest daughter was about to leave primary school and I wanted to make a final piece of work documenting her class. I’d worked with this group on many occasions over the years, mainly looking at the impact that the computer and digital culture had on their lives.

That summer, location based gaming exploded onto the scene and it seemed that much of this group’s time outside school was spent chasing Pokémon around the streets of the city. Using GPS and their camera functions, they roamed the city, inhabiting two worlds at the same time – one geographic and one imaginary. In this set of portraits, I wanted to capture that dual existence, now that space has been re-imagined for us by the appearance of location-based gaming.”

‘Gravitas’ Exhibiting Artists.

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Unsullied And Untarnished

To coincide with our new exhibition, The Ties That Bind‘, on now at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, until April 2016, Jeremy has published a book of his work,  ‘Unsullied And Untarnished’, portraying the Common Riding festivals of the Scottish Borders. The same work forms Jeremy’s contribution to our SNPG show.

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Unsullied And Untarnished’ is photographic portrait of the people of the towns of the Scottish Borders who each year undertake the maintaining of tradition, commemorating their local history and at the same time strengthening the bonds of their communities looking forwards, during the annual Common Riding festivals of the summer months.

Braw Lassies and Honest Lads, Left Hand Lassies and Right Hand Men, Cornets, Hunters and Coldstreamers – all titles given to the upstanding youths who lead the festivities, and whose duty it is to carry the burgh or town standard around the common lands, and to “bring it back unsullied and untarnished”.

To accompany the 58 photographs Document Scotland’s Honorary Patron the Glasgow-born photojournalist Harry Benson has written a foreword, and Alex Massie, Scotland editor of The Spectator, has written a beautiful essay which explains the Common Riding festivals, and what they mean to the participants and communities involved.

 

“Some of these ridings and festivals are ancient, stretching back five centuries and more. Others are more modern but, whatever their roots and antiquity, they have something in common. They are annual gatherings of remembrance and celebration; affirmations that though these may be small places there is nothing small about coming from Kelso or Galashiels, Lauder or Langholm.” – Excerpt from essay, ‘Unsullied And Untarnished’, by Alex Massie.

 

Unsullied and Untarnished book, in Glasgow, Scotland, on Monday, 7 September 2015.

St Margret's Hope for the South Ronaldsay Boys Ploughing Match, in Glasgow, Scotland, on Monday, 7 September 2015.

 

“These festivals are not flashy, for the Border towns are not flashy places….They are an argument for the small places – none of the Border towns, not even Galashiels and Hawick can count as metropolises – and the importance and permanence of place. They maintain the golden threads that stretch back through the ages to a time when the world was a younger place. These festivals are the guardians and custodians of memory and without memory, what does identity matter?” –  Excerpt from essay, ‘Unsullied And Untarnished’, by Alex Massie.

We were fortunate that during the opening night of our show in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery that two of Jeremy’s collaborators from the project made it along to see their portraits hanging on the wall of the show, which has been curated by Anne Lyden, the National Galleries’ International Curator for Photography.

Calum Moffat (left) and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert at Document Scotland's 'The Ties That Bind' exhibition, including 'Unsullied And Untarnished', at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Thursday, 24 September 2015.

Calum Moffat (left) and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert at Document Scotland’s ‘The Ties That Bind’ exhibition, including ‘Unsullied And Untarnished’, at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Thursday, 24 September 2015.

Calum Moffat (above) made the journey from Jedburgh along with his family, and the next day was going to be presenting at his school a little talk on the project and the fact that his portrait made it to the gallery wall. Graham Hamilton (below), the ‘Braw Lad’ of Galashiels in 1989, kindly made it along also, standing by his portrait.

Graham Hamilton and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert at Document Scotland's 'The Ties That Bind' exhibition, including 'Unsullied And Untarnished' at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Thursday, 24 September 2015.

Graham Hamilton and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert at Document Scotland’s ‘The Ties That Bind’ exhibition, including ‘Unsullied And Untarnished’ at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Thursday, 24 September 2015.

 

“Every Common Riding is unique yet, in this important respect, each is just the same as last year’s festivities. These are the permanent things; the ties that bind a people together, that insist upon the specialness of a particular small patch of Scotland. They are the things that make a difference, the things that matter most.

And if you listen carefully you will still hear the hoofbeats of history commanding us to remember and celebrate who we are and whence we have come.” – Excerpt from essay, ‘Unsullied And Untarnished’, by Alex Massie.

Unsullied And Untarnished.
ISBN: 978-0-9933742-0-3
96-pages, hardback, embossed cover.
58 photographs, printed on non-coated paper.

The book is available to purchase directly from Jeremy’s website.

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‘Unsullied And Untarnished’ forms Jeremy’s contribution to Document Scotland’s ‘The Ties That Bind’ photography exhibtion at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, on now until 24th April 2016.
@DocuScotland @NatGalleriesSco #NGSTiesThatBind

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Our new Digital Magazine – Doc006

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‘DOC006 – The Ties That Bind’ is our new digital magazine. Released to coincide with our exhibition of the same name at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, from 26th Sept- 24th April 2016.

Created in collaboration with acclaimed digital masterminds Start Digital, who we enjoyed working with on our first Digital Magazine, ‘The Ties That Bind’ is an easy to download digital catalogue showcasing four projects, from the four members of Document Scotland.

Download this digital exhibition catalogue now from the Apple Store or from Google Play

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Each of the four projects Unsullied and Untarnished by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, When Saturday Comes, by Colin McPherson Drawn to The Land by Sophie Gerrard and A Sweet Forgetting, by Stephen McLaren are those featured in the Scottish National Portrait Gallery exhibition, which has been curated by Anne Lyden.  Here in the app they appear with new and unseen images accompanied by text, audio and multimedia photofilms.

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We’ve been delighted to work again with the team at Start Digital. They created our first digital app for us, and since then we’ve really appreciated the versatility and impact of this digital platform. The layouts are clear and present Document Scotland’s images in a gallery layout. The audio and multimedia adds depth to projects elevating them above the simple layout of the ‘magazine page’ and into a multi dimensional experience. Interactive maps and evocative audio recordings add further complement the projects.

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We hope that you will download and enjoy this exciting new digital publication –

This digital exhibition catalogue ‘Document Scotland: The Ties That Bind’ is available for download for Android and iOS devices from Google Play and the App Store.

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A recent acquisition – St Andrews University archive

Sophie Gerrard's prints being signed for The University of St Andrews Special Collection

Sophie Gerrard’s signed prints from the series Tunnocks, and Drawn To The Land being prepared for The University of St Andrews Special Collection © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved

 

We delivered four lovely boxes of prints and a hard drive of digital files to St Andrews this week and are very pleased that Document Scotland’s work has now become one of the most recent acquisitions to the St Andrews University Special Collection.

Document Scotland started working with Marc Boulay and the University of St Andrews archive just over a year ago.  The University’s Special Collections Division holds over 800,000 images from the 1840s onwards and we are delighted and proud to have our prints and digital files now included in such an extensive, impressive and important collection of photography in Scotland.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert's prints from the series 'Life in The Third' being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s prints from the series ‘Life in The Third’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s prints from the series ‘Unsullied and Untarnished’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Stephen McLaren’s prints from the series ‘Scotia Nova’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Stephen McLaren's prints from the series 'Scotia Nova' being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Stephen McLaren’s prints from the series ‘Scotia Nova’ being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Colin McPherson's prints from the Scottish independence referendum being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Colin McPherson’s prints from the Scottish independence referendum being boxed for the University of St Andrews Special Collection archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

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Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland’s prints and digital files for the archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland's boxes of prints. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

Marc Boulay of The University of St Andrews Special Collections Division, receives Document Scotland’s boxes of prints and digital files for the archive. © Document Scotland 2015 all rights reserved.

 

We’ve had the pleasure of working with the ever charming Marc Boulay and his team at the University over the last year or so. Thank you Marc for all your help, assistance, support and enthusiasm for our work.

 

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