Sophie Gerrard featured in ‘209 Women’ and ‘Sixteen’

There are less than a week to catch 2 exhibitions featuring work by Sophie Gerrard this month. ‘209 Women’ at the Open Eye Liverpool and ‘Sixteen’ at Format Festival in Derby. Both exhibitions finish on the 14th April 2019. If you are in Liverpool or Derby do try and see them.

 

Deidre Brock MP for Edinburgh North & Leith in her constituency at her surgery, Carlton Hill and Leith Walk, Edinburgh, September 2018. All images © Sophie Gerrard 2018 All rights reserved.

209 Women

Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool

209 Women marks 100 years since the first general election in which some women could vote. It seeks to champion the visibility of women: particularly in politics, where decisions are made that affect people of all genders. It features new portraits of the UK’s women MPs, shot entirely by photographers that identify as women. 

It launched on 14 December at the Houses of Parliament, 100 years to the day that the first women walked into polling stations to cast their ballots. Now, it opens in Liverpool with the full set being shown for the first time — including Sinn Féin MPs who abstained from showing their images in the Houses of Parliament.

It’s an opportunity to reflect on how much progress has been made towards gender parity, whilst also highlighting how much more needs to be done, across all spheres of society, each and every day. 

Photography is a tremendously powerful medium of communication, yet all too often we see images in which women have had their agency denied. All the women in this project – both MPs and photographers – worked together to create images that communicated their identities on their terms: their own sense of justice, their own vision for a better world.

The ‘209 Women’ exhibition, featuring Sophie Gerrard’s portrait of Deidre Brock MP, install shot at the Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool. Image © ‘Open Eye Gallery, Tabitha Jussa, 2019’. 

 

I was delighted to be invited to be part of this ambitious and important group project. Deidre Brock MP is an Australian-born Scottish National Party politician. She was first elected as the Member of Parliament for Edinburgh North and Leith in May 2015 — the first SNP representative to hold the seat at either a Westminster or Scottish Parliament level.

Most of my work focuses on contemporary land use and environmental politics and I frequently explore this subject through the eyes of women. So it was a real pleasure to meet and photograph Deidre Brock for this important project. Deidre is a politician I admire in her role as SNP Spokesperson for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and her constituency is one I used to live in.

Huge thanks and congratulations to the great minds and curators behind this initiative Tracy Marshall, Hilary Wood, Cheryl Newman & Lisa Tse

For more info and to take a look through all the fantastic portraits in the 209 Women project please visit the website at www.209women.co.uk , and read about the photographers’ experiences of photographing their chosen MP.

Read about 209 Women in The Guardian, the BBC and hear from some of the MPs including Deidre Brock an article in the Sunday Post 

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/gallery/2018/dec/14/209-female-mps-by-209-female-photographers-in-pictures  https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-46553515  https://www.sundaypost.com/fp/women-about-the-house-new-photography-exhibition-unveils-portraits-of-the-uks-209-female-mps/

 

 

Sixteen

FORMAT International Photography Festival, Derby

 

In a major new touring exhibition leading contemporary photographers join forces to present the multimedia project Sixteen, exploring the dreams, hopes and fears of sixteen-year olds across the UK.

What’s it like to be sixteen years old now? This is the central thread running through multimedia project Sixteen.

Kirsty Noble, 16, Edinburgh. September 2018 Kirsty does a paper round everyday before school – she’d like to be a paramedic. Her granny is the only person she knows who reads a newspaper, all of her friends and classmates read their news online. Image © Sophie Gerrard 2018 All rights reserved.

 

Elsa Galbraith. 16, lives in Braes on the Isle of Skye. She attends school on the island and goes wild swimming in the sea in the mornings. Braes, Isle of Skye, August 2018. Image © Sophie Gerrard 2018 All rights reserved.

Photographer Craig Easton conceived this ambitious project following his engagement with sixteen-year olds at the time of the Scottish Referendum. It was the first, and as yet only, time that these young people were given the vote in the UK. Building on the success of that work he invited 16 of the UK’s foremost documentary portrait photographers to collaborate with young people across the country to make a visual vox pop on what it means to be sixteen now.

Sixteen is an age of transition, of developmental, and of social change. At this time of increasing national and international anxiety, these young people are shifting from adolescence to become the adults who will live in a politically reshaped country, divorced from the Europe Union.

Robbie Strathdee, 16, lives in Leeds. He’s photographed here working as a conservation volunteer in the Flow Country, in the NE of Scotland. “In 10 years time I’d like to feel as if I was part of a movement towards a more sustainable future for my whole generation, I think it would be really cool to be part of a new era of the way humans interact with the world around us.” Image © Sophie Gerrard 2018 All rights reserved.

I began photographing sixteen year olds around the time of the Scottish Independence Referendum in 2014, Craig also began his project at that time, at a time when 16 year olds could vote in a major political decision, it was a unique time, and hearing the voices of those young voters was inspiring. Many were well informed, opinionated and responsible. Craig then broadened out his project to include 16 photographers and the whole of the UK ands also included curator Anne Braybon and producer Liz Wewiora. I was proud to be invited to join such a talented group of photographers. The resulting exhibitions in Salford, Manchester and Derby highlight just how important it is to listen to young people. At a time of uncertainty and fear, these young voices offer hope, insight, maturity and positivity. It’s been an inspiration to be involved.

 

 

 

Project Sixteen at Format 19 International Photography Festival, Derby, March 2019.

Photographers: Jillian Edelstein, Kalpesh Lathigra, Lottie Davies, Simon Roberts, Sophie Gerrard, Stuart Freedman, Kate Peters, Roy Mehta, Abbie Trayler-Smith, Antonio Olmos, Linda Brownlee, Christopher Nunn, Michelle Sank, Ronan McKenzie, Kate Kirkwood and Simon Wheatley.

Read more about Project Sixteen in The Guardian and the BJP and see fantastic portraits by all the photographers involved. You can also watch a excellent film of the project made by Robert Brady here

     
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10 From The North | 10 bho Tuath – an An Lanntair exhibition

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Panel Discussion – Women on the Land – 9th March 2016

On Wednesday 9th March at 12:45pm Sophie will be taking part in a panel discussion with historian Dr Elizabeth Ritchie (University of the Highlands and Islands) and crofter and writer Liz Paul, will look at the history and context of women crofters in Scotland and beyond.

This panel discussion will take place in The Scottish National Portrait Gallery and all are welcome!

 

Screen shot 2016-03-03 at 14.24.47

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Beyond The Border – Impressions Gallery – You’re invited!

We’ve been furiously checking prints, sending work to the framers, proofing text, editing, making phonecalls, and finishing long term projects shot over the last year or more in preparation for our group show, Beyond The Border: New Contemporary Photography from Scotland at Impressions Gallery in Bradford. We are delighted to invite you to the opening night which is on the 3rd July.

If you can’t make the opening evening, then there will be a series of professional development events including portfolio reviews and an artists’ talk with Sophie Gerrard, Colin McPherson and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert on Saturday 26th July. We’d be delighted to see you at those, please follow the links above for further details and booking info as places are limited.

Otherwise – if you are in Bradford over the summer please come along and see the exhibition. It opens on the 1st July and runs through till the 27th September. It’s been a pleasure to work with Anne McNeil and her wonderful team from Impressions Gallery on this and we look forward to seeing you on the 3rd to hear Anne Lyden from The Scottish National Portrait Gallery officially open the exhibition and to share a Tunnocks Caramel Wafer and wee dram or two.

Cheers.

Sophie, Colin, Jeremy & Stephen.

 

e-invite

Beyond The Border, New Contemporary Photography from Scotland at Impressions Gallery from 1st July – 27th September 2014

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Why I Took this Picture ….. Mary – by Sophie Gerrard

Mary at home on her farm in Crieff, rural Perthshire from the series Drawn To The Land © Sophie Gerrard 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Spring 2013 was one of the coldest on record – it almost never really came. Farmers all over Scotland were concerned and anxious that by mid April, there was still no sign of grass,  that’s pretty much unheard of. 15 foot snow drifts on Arran over Easter and -5 degrees recorded in Fort William added to the worry. It was an extremely testing time for farmers as they tried to look after sheep out on the hill giving birth into what should be warmer weather with fresh spring grass to feed on.

As I’ve started to spend more time in the Scottish landscape and take more photographs over the last year or so I’ve found myself drawn to stories of human relationships with the land and the emotional connections. The more I’ve started to engage with issues concerning our Scottish landscape – the more I’ve felt drawn to look at them through the eyes of women- purely because I think its something that’s not often represented. When you look to farming all over the world – women play a hugely important role – in Scotland the same applies.

Mary runs a farm in Perthshire which has been tenanted by her family since the early 1900s. Whilst spending time with her she talked passionately and emotionally about her relationship with the farm and the landscape. The day I made this picture we’d just finished spent going round the farm checking on the pregnant ewes. The ground was frozen solid, there was no fresh grass, Mary had fed everyone by hand and checked all were alright. We’d been blown about, got muddy and dirty, crossed swollen rivers, driven up into the snow for the high fields, and returned back to the house to warm up. I took this picture as we stood at her kitchen window looking over the farm….

“I see myself not as a landowner but as custodian of this beautiful place, I feel I have an moral obligation and responsibility to leave it as good if not better than it was when I came here. I never felt forced into farming. I was told it was here if I wanted it, it’s in my blood. I can’t imagine having done anything else and I think it’d be extremely difficult to do this work otherwise. It’s not an inviting industry for young women to enter into however and the average age of a farmer now is 58. The farm is the most important thing, it’s really the only thing as far as I’m concerned. I want to leave this place in a box, and I’m left with a dilemma now that neither of my daughters are interested in the farm. ”

 

Sophie’s photograph, and others from her series, ‘Drawn To The Land’, can be seen at Fotospace Gallery, Rothes Halls, Glenrothes, as part of the ‘Seeing Ourselves’ exhibition, which is curated by Document Scotland. The exhibition continues until August 1st 2013.
Document Scotland’s latest newspaper, which accompanies the exhibition, can be bought via our publications page.

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