Undertow & A9 – Frances Scott

Frances Scott is a photographer whose work Document Scotland have admired having enjoyed her book Undertow, published by Another Place Press, detailing her walks over the Orkney islands. A recently published ‘zine also by by the same publisher features a previous body of work, the A9 project, documenting Frances’ journeys between the Scottish Borders and the Orkney islands. Sophie met with Frances over zoom recently and took the opportunity to talk to her in more depth about these projects.

Some of our conversation is here, in Frances’ answers below, but to hear more and listen to Frances talk in detail about the work, please head over to our Patreon site where you can watch the video and learn more.

DS: When did you become a photographer – what was your early career and education and how did you get started?

FS: I studied Communication Design at Glasgow School of Art from 2010-14. The first two years of the course were broad (a mixture of illustration, graphic design and photography). In third year, after some difficulty choosing, I specialised in photography, and made the worthwhile discovery that by narrowing your area of study, you can deepen your focus, and get considerably more from it.

After graduating in 2014 I moved back to Orkney and struggled to get a job in the field I’d studied. I ended up working as cabin crew for Loganair, working solo on the lifeline flights which service Scotland’s islands. This meant I got to leave Orkney almost every day, and so I never really suffered from the ‘cabin fever’ you can get living on an island. Meanwhile, in 2016 I grouped together with a number of recent art graduates based in Orkney to form the Móti Collective, and after a bit of a hiatus began making artwork again. Our aim was to unite early career artists and designers who were either based in or returning to the islands, and celebrate Orkney’s importance as a creative hub in the north.

In early 2017 I got a job working as a photography technician at the GSA, and while I’m keen to assert the importance of not having an entirely city-centric creative practice there have been undeniable benefits to my career from being based in the Central Belt. At the same time, I miss Orkney very much, and maintain my links with my home – it has continued as the focus of much of my work, and I’m still a member of the Móti Collective, albeit a long-distance one.

From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow,  by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow,  by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

DS: You started making Undertow in 2016, going for walks – it’s something many can relate to at the moment, how did those walks turn into a project?

FS: I began walking the coastline of the Orkney mainland in the spring of 2016, driven by the desire to know Orkney better, and primarily as a walking project rather than a photographic one. I wanted to really understand my home – to see how all the familiar places linked up, and to make my own claim on the island by walking it.

After four years of art school, experiencing life behind a lens, I wanted to be free from the need to document everything. It was important to be free to walk without interruption, to be fully present. The process of walking opened Orkney up to me – it made me see more, look harder, and remember better. Orkney grew, and keeps on growing.

When I started I didn’t have the funds nor the facilities to make analogue photographs, so I left my ‘real’ camera at home. I did however use an iPhone to gather ‘photosketches’ – quick, non-intrusive image gathering. I also recorded the walks using GPS and handwritten notes on maps. Over time, two things catalysed this project into artwork: taking part in a series of exhibitions as part of the Móti Collective from late 2016-18, and a research residency supported by Stills: Centre for Photography in 2018.

From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

Having completed the coastline of the Orkney mainland in summer 2018, the Stills residency led me on to the coastlines of the North Isles: North Ronaldsay, Papay and Rousay. On these new walks around islands where I’ve never lived, I brought my Mamiya 645, loaded with black and white film. Initially, finding a balance between photographing and walking was a struggle. I felt the pressure of an audience for whom I had to create images, the weight of the camera on my hip; I was no longer alone on these walks. But working in this way has been vital in sharing and communicating my experience, and the images are also of value to me, so I am adapting.

Some of these film photographs were exhibited in 2019 at Stills in the group show AMBIT: Photographies from Scotland, and this year work from the series was published as a photobook entitled ‘Undertow’ by the Another Place Press, an independent publisher based in the Scottish Highlands. I’ve become accustomed to the rhythm of these walks as part of my life and my creative work, and I feel the loss of them just now during the pandemic when I can’t travel home.

From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

DS: Writing is clearly a very important part of your practise, does that come first? And the images later – how does this process work for you and why is it important to include both in your projects?

FS: Even as images have taken more of a ‘leading role’ within my coastline project, the writing always happens first. After each walk I record my experiences on an OS Map, long before I process my film and see the photographic results of the walk.

Writing helps preserve the memory of each walk for me, and also to share the experience with others. It patches the gaps that photographs can’t, and thereby relieves some pressure on me – I might witness something too fleeting or dark to capture with a camera, but because I can record it in writing instead, it’s okay that I’ve only seen it with my eyes. Afterwards, writing allows visual or other sensory experiences to bloom naturally in the mind of the reader, and there is a roominess or fluidity in it that is perhaps not shared by the fixed and unbending nature of photographs.

I think the way I approach writing helps. It’s just ‘notes’ – notes on a map, or in a sketchbook, or on a scrap of paper. If these notes have anything of value in them, I can use or adapt them later. If I thought of it as proper ‘writing’ which might be published or exhibited from the beginning, I’d probably find myself intimidated and unable to get things down on paper.

From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
Book insert from the publication Undertow,  by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
Book layout spreads from the publication Undertow,  by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
Book layout spreads from the publication Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

DS: What was it like making this project into a book? It’s a beautiful object, how did the design and publishing process come together?

FS: It was daunting turning what had become a huge focus of my life into a book: how could I communicate my whole experience in book form? To alleviate some of the pressure of this, I choose to see the work I make about the project as creative ‘branches’ which grow from the experience, while the walks at their core remain mine, and separate from any artwork made about them.

I chose to only use the black and white film photographs in the book, as the iPhone photos wouldn’t sit well alongside them – they speak a different language. But without this sense of colour, something about the experience was left out – and so the book is accompanied by an insert which contains written notes from the Mainland and Rousay, small note-poems which try to convey the feeling of each walk through words. Also included in the book were maproutes
and handwritten maps of two of the North Isles.

Normally when laying out a photobook the images themselves lead the way, but I also had chronology to contend with: I wanted the reader to encounter each place in the same order I had. This created some complications in repetition and flow but over time these issues were smoothed out, until both Iain Sarjeant and I were happy with the layout. I chose a muted pink for the colour of the insert – this ‘glow’ is something I had associated with the walks in the form of sea-pinks, or the setting sun glancing off waves, or in the fiery clouds above, and I wanted some of this warmth to counter the greyscale images. The cover is simple, just a line that I walked (in this case part of the Deerness peninsula). It brings the project back to its roots – the brink between land and sea.

From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, 2016 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series Undertow, by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

DS: When did the A9 project come about? It’s a fascinating document of a journey between two very important places in your life – why choose the road – is journey important to you?

FS: During my two years as a photo specialist at GSA, my tutor Andy Stark said ‘Your work is about journeys’. I’m interested in the way we store feelings or memories in the land, and how travelling through a landscape can help you process your thoughts in time with the landscape. I came across a piece of writing by Rosemary Sullivan a number of years ago that said ‘The landscape of childhood provides the foundation layer of our psyche’. I like to look at the way these formative landscapes become part of our fundamental understanding of the world. My childhood was spent split between the north and south – my original home of Orkney, where my dad lived; Caithness, where my mum’s parents lived; and my temporary home of Hawick in the Scottish Borders with my mum. My internal landscape has always contained an awareness of and a yearning for ‘somewhere else’.

From the series A9, 2014 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series A9, by Frances Scott. © 2014 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series A9, 2014 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series A9, by Frances Scott. © 2014 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

I made the A9 series in 2014 at the tail end of my final year of art school. The project comes from my childhood living alone with my mum, and the many times she drove us northwards to see my family. It’s about the safety of the backseat, an only child with a car window for company. It’s also about leaving home, and the journey south to the city. The road links two halves of myself – a north/south, mum/dad, island/city, childhood/adulthood binary.

From the series A9, 2014 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series A9, by Frances Scott. © 2014 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series A9, 2014 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series A9, by Frances Scott. © 2014 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

DS: Does this work include writing in such an important way too – or is it more image focused.

FS: Small paragraphs of writing are interspersed throughout the photozine. I use these to tell the story of the three days spent driving and photographing the road in 2014. I think I would have found it too difficult to pinpoint in writing exactly what the A9 holds for me, so it was better to focus on this one particular journey, which was the very first time I had driven the whole road alone. The writing hovers over the surface of a deeper sense of nostalgia associated with the A9. Because I was a relatively young woman, putting myself outside of the normal rules of travelling, I had a number of strange encounters over the course of the journey – including being stopped by the police and confronted by a gamekeeper, both while walking alone with my camera. Without including it in writing, this perspective would be lost. These written interludes invite the viewer to share this solitary journey with me.

From the series A9, 2014 by Frances Scott. © 2016 Frances Scott All rights reserved.
From the series A9, by Frances Scott. © 2014 Frances Scott All rights reserved.

DS: You’re working with Another Place Press again, tell us more about that relationship.

FS: Iain Sarjeant has been a supportive figure in the industry for a number of years now – I was encouraged back in 2015 when he featured some of my degree work on his online platform ‘Another Place Magazine’. At the time, I remember discovering his ‘Out of the Ordinary’ series and being fascinated by his images of Orkney, Caithness, Aberdeen – I was delighted to see the care and attention he gave to these places which had often felt snubbed or overlooked during my time as a student in Glasgow. Since then, Iain has kept an eye on my work on social media, and in late 2018 he approached me to ask if I might like to turn my coastline project into a book with Another Place Press. We’ve met in person a few times, but most of our planning/design correspondence takes place over email, a very democratic and open exchange of PDFs and ideas. Iain grew up in the Highlands, and understands the motivation behind my projects – I don’t have to explain why the places in my work are important to me, as they are often significant to him too.

DS: What’s next for you?
FS: I’ll be continuing my project to walk the coastlines of Orkney, since there’s a lot of coastline left. I’m going to keep making work about it, so perhaps there will be a sequel to Undertow in the coming years. The Covid-19 restrictions have unfortunately disrupted that project (I live in Glasgow and can’t travel to Orkney at the moment), so I’m having to be patient for now. In the meantime, I’ll be showing some work in an exhibition this month with the Móti Collective in Orkney, and I’m currently setting up a studio space in my flat.

DS: Thanks so much Frances, it was great to chat with you and hear more about these projects.

To see more of Frances’ work go to her website www.frances-scott.co.uk

Frances’ A9 ‘zine is available to purchase for just £8 from publisher Another Place Press

Her book Undertow is sold out on Another Place Press but you might be able to find a copy at Streetlevel Photoworks or the Pier Arts Centre Orkney, or other photography book sellers in Scotland.

Save It For a Rainy Day – Doro Zinn

Save It For a Rainy Day, by photographer Doro Zinn, is currently showing at Glasgow’s Street Level Photoworks until the 8th September.

Document Scotland photographer Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert caught up with Doro via email, kindly she’s allowing us to share some of her photography from The Gorbals, an area of Glasgow which has been much frequented by photographers over the years, including Bert Hardy, Bill Brandt, John Claridge, Hugh Hood, Oscar Marzaroli, and more recently Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert himself, Sarah Amy Fishlock and more.

Document Scotland – How did you get into photography, what do you do, tell us a little about yourself?

I studied Political Sciences and Psychology in Vienna. To gain some working experience I spent a year in Bangkok and worked with UNHCR (the refugee agency of the UN). Around that time I started to photograph my surroundings and the people I met, trying to avoid stereotypes. A group of (conflict-)photographers, who I was friends with, encouraged me to continue taking photos. Back in Vienna, I had made my decision to become a photographer, finished my studies and applied at Ostkreuzschule für Fotografie in Berlin, where I learned to deepen my documentary practice and started to work on long term projects, exploring Identity, marginalization and belonging and the question of how to depict these.

Blessed John Duns Scotus Church, by Doro Zinn
Sharkey’s Bar, by Doro Zinn

How did you come to be in Glasgow shooting in the Gorbals, as you come from Berlin?

I was invited by Street Level Photoworks due to a residency exchange called Photographic Parallels between Glasgow and Berlin. Robert Henderson, a Glaswegian photographer went to Berlin for a month and I came to Glasgow for roughly the same amount of time.

I only had a vague concept of Glasgow before I arrived, but I had read a lot about the different districts to prepare for my stay. In my research on photography in the more destitute areas of Glasgow I discovered Kirsty MacKay and Margaret Mitchell, who’s work I found deeply interesting, engaging and eyeopening. Steven Berkoff’s photos from the 60s, shot in the Gorbals, were on show at SLP and I was shocked how desolate the area looked back then—I decided to walk around Glasgow and ended up in the Gorbals. The area’s mixed housing, the streets and shops and the people I saw sparked my interest instantly. I wanted to know more about the people living there and how they conceived the the changes that had occurred in their surroundings.
“Save it for a Rainy Day“ is a personal encounter with the people living in the Gorbals, a chance to tell their stories, depicting the new and old and ever-changing Gorbals.

Bryan, by Doro Zinn
Gorbals Street/ Norfolk Street, by Doro Zinn

This was the first time in my photographic career that I planned on meeting people on the street. It took quite a few days until i summoned up the courage to just ask people if they wanted to be part of my project. In the end I walked into the Catholic church and started chatting with the very nice lady at the counter, Maureen, who then ended up to be the first person I photographed in the Gorbals. This gave me the confidence to approach other people and she also introduced me to Bridigin’ the Gap, a community organisation working in the Gorbals. They gave me some contacts and invited me to their community meals, where I met more people and from then on it was quite easy.

I mostly meet them upfront to get to know them a little bit and to see if they have a genuine interest in having their portrait taken.
I also spent as much time as they allow me to spend with them.

Jean and Will, by Doro Zinn
Jean and Will’s living room, by Doro Zinn.

I spent basically everyday for 3 weeks in July/August in the Gorbals—walking around, exploring the area and connecting to people.
After realizing back home that some some elements of the series were still missing, I came back in October—this time with a different approach.
During my first stay I was looking around, trying to connect and had a very open approach to what would be happening. The second time I made appointments beforehand and knew exactly where to go.

I shot digital for this project to be able to process the photos straight away and to get an oversight over what I was photographing since 4 weeks isn’t a long time to realise a project. Digital also gives me the opportunity to shoot at night or in darker environments without needing to use flash.

Patricia, by Doro Zinn
Jim and Domino, by Doro Zinn

It was great to work in Glasgow, particularly in the Gorbals. People were very openminded and welcoming. I drank tons of breakfast tea with milk and ate a lot of scones. Every day I discovered new facets of the district.
On the other hand I was staggered to see, how matters of religion and politics were dividing people. In Germany it is no issue at all if someone is Protestant or Catholic. Before I came to Scotland I didn’t know that this conflict existed outside Ireland. Some of the couples I photographed were inter-religious and experienced a lot of opposition by family and society when they married. Most of the people I photographed also went to segregated schools and some were really fond of their religion, taking part in the Orange March for example.
Also the state of the social system came as quite a shock—how little people were supported by the state and how the social played a more obstructing than supporting role. On the other hand it was great to see that organisations like Bridging the Gap and the Men Shed are keeping the community together and make a great difference.

Most of the people I photographed have seen the exhibition and their feedback was throughout positive. Four of the women were even at the opening, which was great!

Maureen’s living room, by Doro Zinn
Mari, by Doro Zinn

The project is finished for now, but I would like to return and continue at some point, because I think there are a lot of characters from the Gorbals I haven’t met and a lot of things I didn’t get the chance to know yet. There’s also some issues I would have liked to focus on more, but lacked the time.

– The work is on show at SLP until September 8th, but are there plans to publish it, or exhibition it elsewhere? If it is published already is there a link to where people can buy the publication online?

Me and Jan Motyka have made a publication, a picture newspaper that is more extensive than the exhibition and grants a deeper view – it is available at SLP or online at http://www.streetlevelphotoworks.org/product/doro-book

The plan is that the exhibition will travel to Berlin, but the dates and venue are not set yet.

– What are you working on now?

I am currently on maternity leave in Italy, but thinking up projects to work on, once I am back in Berlin in October. In the meantime I am taking portraits of the people I meet along the way.

– Many thanks Doro for sharing your work and thoughts with us. It’s much appreciated. 

If You’re Not Rebelling, You’re Not Paying Attention

 

“If you’re not rebelling, you’re not paying attention”Photographs by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert.

From young to old, seasoned campaigners to those learning to take action, the streets of Glasgow, Edinburgh and further afield in Britain, have been occupied recently by those exasperated with council and government policy on climate change inaction. As the placards read, “The oceans are rising and so are we”, and “If you’re not rebelling, you’re not paying attention.”

The ‘Blue Wave’ demonstration by the Extinction Rebellion climate change group and supporters, blocking roads and moving through the streets of the city to highlight the rising waters of the River Clyde and to warn of the dangers of climate change if urgent action isn’t taken immediately. In Glasgow, Scotland, March 2019. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2019.

 

Extinction Rebellion Scotland climate protestors block roads demanding that the City Council declare a climate emergency. In Glasgow, Scotland, 21 March 2019. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2019.

 

“Wake Up” – Activists and supporters of Extinction Rebellion climate group hold a picnic outside the Glasgow City Chambers demanding that the city council declare a climate emergency and create a ‘Scottish Citizens’ Assembly’ to oversee the changes to climate change policy. The activists vow to hold the picnic protests on a daily basis until climate action is taken by the city council. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2019.

 

A photographer with Greenpeace International for almost 20 years I’m lucky/unlucky enough to have seen first hand the effects of climate change on countries around the world. I’ve seen through my lens the hardship of life on the 1-metre high Carteret’s Atoll in the Pacific Ocean; I’ve flown over the clear-cut lands of Sumatra in Indonesia documenting the sickening sight of virgin rainforest deforestation taking place; I’ve documented the indentured slavery of the loggers working in the rainforests of Papua New Guinea selecting and cutting down hardwoods to ship to China; and I’ve photographed at dawn in the North Atlantic as activists from Greenpeace protest and board a ship carrying palm oil to Rotterdam.

Having seen first hand the problems we face, and are causing, I’m interested to see the actions taking place in the streets, to meet the youths striking from school and further education to protest outside the Scottish Parliament and to hear their views, and to photograph the actions of Extinction Rebellion protesters having their daily picnic outside the Glasgow City Chambers, or blocking North Bridge in Edinburgh. I honestly do fear for the world that the youth of today will grow up to inherit, the environmental problems that will have to be dealt with. Hopefully some of the youths I’ve met will continue to protest, and more importantly, ultimately find solutions to the problems the climate and the world faces.

 

‘Youth Strike 4 Climate’ protestors, outside the Scottish Parliament, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Friday 12th April 2019. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2019.
Left: Tess (16yrs), “As a young person I feel I have a responsibility to show I care about our future.” Right: Grace (17yrs) – “Climate change is ignored by parliament and action needs to be taken.”

 

 

‘Youth Strike 4 Climate’ protestors, outside the Scottish Parliament, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Friday 12th April 2019. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2019.
Left: Jack (11yrs) – “The Inuits won’t be able to live how they want to.” Right: Grace (15yrs) – “It is increasingly more essential to make small changes, as small actions create a bigger change.”

 

‘Youth Strike 4 Climate’ protestors, outside the Scottish Parliament, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Friday 12th April 2019. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2019.
Left: Anna (14yrs) – “If people don’t take notice we won’t have a future.” Right: Catriona (15yrs) – I’m here to get the government and older generation’s attention to save our future, as we won’t have one without action.”

 

‘Youth Strike 4 Climate’ protestors, outside the Scottish Parliament, in Edinburgh, Scotland, on Friday 12th April 2019. ©Jeremy Sutton-HIbbert 2019.
Left: Artemis (9yrs) – “I’m here to give the animals a future, and me a future. I worry about all the animals that live in the Arctic North and are suffering from results of human activities. I believe strongly in animal rights and they deserve a future without their home melting.” Right: Joseph (16yrs) – “I’m tired of being told to not use plastic bottles, to take small individual actions, when what we need is for the government to do something.”

 

‘Blue Wave’ demonstration by the Extinction Rebellion climate change group and supporters, blocking roads and moving through the streets of the city to warn of the dangers of climate change if urgent action isn’t taken immediately. © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2019.

 

To see more climate photography by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert is on his website, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert on Instagram and the EverydayClimateChange Instagram group of which he is a contributor.

Starlings On Fire – Peter Iain Campbell

30th July 2016

“ It tests you physically, mentally and emotionally. Every single corner of your psyche gets

seriously rinsed out here……….”

(Title image: Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.)

Starlings On Fire, © Peter iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

SEARCHING FOR THE ANTITHESIS / A TANGLED WEB OF PIPING
11th November 2013 – 12th August 2014
Being strapped to a seat inside a metal cylinder and then submerged in a large, deep pool of tepid
water, to perform helicopter safety and escape drills, was the easy part. Establishing a way of
getting onto an offshore installation in the North Sea to work, let alone undertake a photography
project, was definitely going to be the hard part.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

In late 2013, a sequence of photography projects and wild notions had brought me to an Offshore
Survival Centre in Aberdeen where I undertook the Basic Offshore Safety Induction and
Emergency Training course – the minimum requirement for anyone wanting to work offshore in
the Oil and Gas Industry. Completing the course didn’t guarantee anything, other than a fairly
deep hole in my pockets.
For the following 10 months, while continuing my work as a photographer, I contacted all the
Recruitment Agencies, Drilling Contractors and Facilities Companies based in Aberdeen, trying to
find a route into the offshore world. I had to be very resourceful. Photography is not a
particularly transferable skill into the Oil and Gas Industry.
I got lucky, and in August 2014 I started my first, 2-week trip offshore. It was on the Janice Alpha
Platform, situated in the central North Sea, approximately 175 miles south east of Aberdeen.
I remember my first helicopter flight. I was simultaneously excited and anxious. It was the
antithesis of the life as a photographer I had known up to that point. Exactly what I was looking
for. As we approached the production platform, I looked out of the window and witnessed this
vibrant, bright orange gas flare and what appeared to me to be a chaotic, tangled web of piping
floating in the sea. It seemed surreal, alien and almost post-apocalyptic. My life offshore was
about to begin.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Mid-2013
The genesis of ‘Starlings On Fire’ came in the form of two projects that I was working on
simultaneously during 2013, but which were conceived independently of each other. These
projects formed part of my ongoing interest in post-industrial landscapes. There was an
overarching dystopian nature to both projects.
I had been researching archival images that had the potential to be physically projected back into
some of the decayed ‘monolithic’ environments that I had been shooting in. I kept returning to an
image I have which dates back to the early 1900s. It depicts two diving men sitting opposite each
other, outside a telescopic gasholder, presumably about to commence interior test work on the
holder. I find the image truly captivating. It haunts me. I know nothing about the two men or the
photographer who took the picture.

 

granton_web
Gas Holder No.1, Granton Gas Works, ca. 1905, Photographer Unknown.

 

I started to examine the cache of albums that accompanied this image. They document the
construction of the Granton Gas Works in Edinburgh. I wondered about the lives of the workers
depicted in these photographs, posing with a steely, emotionless gaze towards the camera,
dwarfed by the construction of huge buildings and machinery that surrounded them. I was lost in
the notion of living during that time – documenting the construction of this vast world. I started
to consider the idea of producing a body of work now, which could act as a kind of ‘time capsule’
and be something looked back through in 20 or 30 years time. I needed an industry that
remained relatively unchanged since its beginnings and was somehow cocooned from the social,
political and economic pressures exerted on more land based industries.
I was intrigued by the incongruous existence of the offshore Oil and Gas Installation – a collision
of industry and nature. I quickly established that the only way I was going to be able to produce a
body of photographic work offshore was to try and work out there.

 

October 2016
I worked for 2 years onboard a Drilling Rig in the North Sea, situated approximately 130 miles
east of Aberdeen. After about 5 months working on a 3:3 Rotation (3 weeks on/ 3 weeks off) and
having bedded myself in to the demands and culture of offshore life, I was granted permission to
start shooting on the rig. Initially, this was restricted to seascapes only. I shot the entire project
on 120 film, which aside from what Roger Ballen calls the ‘great alchemy of analogue’, meant that
I didn’t have to get a Permit to Work every time I wanted to shoot. This was a good thing. It gave
me relative freedom to work around my 12-hour daily shifts and I often worked at night, where
shooting opportunities often only presented themselves at 2 or 3am in the morning.

 

Starlings On Fire, ©Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

The seascapes were more than just a photographic opportunity however. The entire process
became ritualistic and a means of escape, metaphorically speaking. This was my incentive and
motivation for getting through an arduous shift or trip. The magic hour (at both ends of the day)
became a period of reflective solitude, yet the perpetual humming of the rig always prevented the
experience from developing into something more spiritual.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

A positive acknowledgement of my seascape work allowed me to extend the scope of the project.
I was granted unprecedented access to the entire rig and with the approval of the on-shift driller,
I could shoot in and around its fulcrum, the drill floor. I was constantly drawn to this area.
Between the driller’s digital control hub, ‘The Dog House’, and the machinery and workings on
the drill floor, I often thought it was like entering the combined fictional worlds of H.G.Wells and
William Gibson. I was a photographer documenting heavy industry in the late 1800’s, but in a
strange parallel universe where there had been a sudden spike in technological advancement.
I developed a strong relationship with the core and third party crews onboard, but I had an
almost equal interest in the architecture, machinery and layout of the rig. There’s an underlying
feeling of isolation, volatility and danger offshore. The confined physical environment can be
claustrophobic, the natural elements harsh and brutal. By combining the seascapes and the
portraits I wanted to convey these qualities, but maintain a certain level of distance and
anonymity between the crew and the viewer, referencing the archival industrial photographs
that had inspired me three years earlier.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

31st July 2016

“ Do you know where you’ll be redeployed when this contract is up? ”

“ Aye…..the dole queue.”

“Hah, really?!”

“Aye, I’m not fucking kidding. This is the third slump I’ve experienced and it’s definitely the

worst. I think the North Sea’s fucked. I don’t think it’ll ever recover………unless we get a good

old war……….. the good times are gone. The way I see it, if this is gonna be my last trip, then I

reckon this could be my last time offshore. If there are jobs out here, then the money’ll

probably be shite.”

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

There are many areas within the Oil and Gas Industry that are deeply problematic and
controversial. The offshore installation almost acts as a provocative totem for the industry.
When I started this project in August 2014 the price of oil was approximately $110 per barrel
and there was much speculation that the industry in the North Sea would continue to thrive for
another 30 – 40 years.
By February 2016 the price of oil had slumped to an 11 year low of $28 per barrel. Oil companies,
suppliers and contractors started streamlining their operations, which lead to many people
across the industry losing their jobs. The North Sea was particularly hard hit. Its waters are
amongst the most expensive in the world for carrying out Oil and Gas exploration and
production. This year the Industry approved less than £1billion to spend on new projects,
compared to a typical £8billion per year in the last five years. According to Oil and Gas UK’s
Activity Survey, published in February 2016, if the price of oil were to remain at approx. $30 for
the remainder of 2016 then nearly half (43%) of all UKCS (UK Continental Shelf) oil fields would
likely be operating at a loss, deterring any further exploration and investment.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

The number of Drilling Rigs operating in the North Sea plunged in September to 27, the lowest
number since records began in 1982. In the same month, the drilling contract for the Drilling Rig
I worked on expired. The vast majority of the crew onboard were served notice of redundancy
and the rig was towed into the shipyard, where it remains today.
Decommissioning in the North Sea is being viewed across sections of the industry as being the
major investment opportunity of the future.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

21st July 2016

“ Pink Floyd! Is that Pink Floyd?! ”

“ No. It’s Mogwai.”

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.
Starlings On Fire, © Peter Iain Campbell, all rights reserved.

 

Many thanks to Peter Iain Campbell for allowing us to share his project.

Peter Iain Campbell photography website, and Peter Iain Campbell on Instagram.

Looking over the border

Fareweel to a’ oor Scottish fame
Fareweel oor ancient glory
Fareweel even tae oor Scottish name
Sae famed in martial story
Noo Sark runs o’er the Solway sands
Tweed runs tae the ocean
Tae mark where
England’s province stands
Such a parcel o’ rogues in a nation

– Robert Burns, 1791

Exactly two years ago, I embarked on a 12-month journey to trace Scotland’s border with England. The result was A Fine Line.

Starting in the frontier town of Gretna, separated from England by the tiny river Sark, I followed a meandering series of paths, tracks and roads and over the next year drifted from west to east, finally ending my journey at the North Sea, a few miles north of Berwick-upon-Tweed.

The purpose was part-documentary, part self-discovery: I wanted to explore my identity as a Scot exiled in England through photography and with the referendum on Scottish Independence on the horizon, it seemed to be the perfect time for such a project.

My travels took me to towns and villages, moorland and hilltops. I photographed people I encountered along the way and events which make up the fabric of life on the border. I researched my trips, looking at the geography, history and topography of my destinations, but beyond that, I left it to my mind and eyes to wander across the stunning landscapes and ancient settlements. The only restriction I placed on myself was that all the images should be ‘made in Scotland’.

Shooting everything on a single, medium-format film camera allowed me to focus on the content of the images without the distraction of choices of different lenses. The result was a fusion of documentary, portraiture and landscape photography which was put together to reflect my personal experiences and points-of-view.

The first phase of the project initially appeared in our debut Seeing Ourselves exhibition in 2013 at Fotospace. On the strength of that work, Anne MacNeill, curator of Impressions Gallery, encouraged me to keep the project going, to which end it was displayed as part of our Beyond the Border show in Bradford last summer.

As the debate and discussion around Scotland’s ongoing relationship with her bigger, more powerful neighbour continues through the ballot boxes at Westminster and Holyrood, I envisage retuning to the border lands some time soon and rediscovering the people and places of this unique habitat.

© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Welcome to Scotland, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Married Couple, Gretna, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Solway Firth, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Wedding, Gretna Green, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Rod Stewart, Gretna, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Burial Ground, Canonbie, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Holm Show, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Site of the Battle of Redeswire, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2013, all rights reserved.
‘Salmon Nets, Paxton House, 2013.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2014, all rights reserved.
‘Woman with a Union Jack Bag, Town Yetholm, 2014.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2014, all rights reserved.
‘Berwickshire Coastal Park, 2014.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.
© Colin McPherson, 2014, all rights reserved.
‘Inshore Waters, 2014.’ Photograph © Colin McPherson, all rights reserved.

 

 

The Scottish Independence Referendum

 

Highs, lows, an historical and unforgettable week for Scotland.

Here are some of the images shot by Colin McPherson, Sophie Gerrard, Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert and Stephen McLaren in the lead up to and over the 18th September 2014. The world was watching, and so were we…

 

 

Colin McPherson

(above: Alex Salmond and a supporter take a ‘selfie’, Perth, Scotland image © Colin McPherson 2014, all rights reserved.)

© Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.
A pro-independence gathering in George Square, Glasgow © Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.
The audience cheer as former British Prime Minister Gordon Brown MP delivers a speech to supporters at a Better Together rally at Community Central Hall, Glasgow © Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.
A musician with flaming bagpipes leads a spontaneous march to mobilise support for a pro-independence vote on the day of the independence referendum, Craigmillar, Edinburgh © Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.
Members of the Protestant Orange Order march through Edinburgh © Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.
Scottish socialist campaigner and former parliamentarian Tommy Sheridan speaking at Shottstown Miners Welfare club in Penicuik, Midlothian © Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.
A pro-independence supporter breaks down in tears outside the Scottish Parliament building in Edinburgh as the results of the referendum on Scottish independence are announced. © Colin McPherson 2014 all rights reserved.

 

 

Sophie Gerrard

140918SG_IndyRef_9698
The media village outside the Scottish Parliament at Holyrood, Edinburgh, on a misty 18th September 2014, the day of the independence referendum. © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.

 

Union Flag and St Andrews Cross fly from a front garden in Argyll, Scotland. © Sophie gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.
The Union Flag and St Andrews Cross fly from a garden in Argyll, Scotland. © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.

 

140918SG_IndyRef_9662
The Craxton Family at their local polling station, Edinburgh, 18th September 2014 © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.

 

140918SG_IndyRef_9675
Erik Kruse at his local polling station, Edinburgh, 18th September 2014 © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.

 

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A family at their local polling station, Edinburgh, 18th September 2014 © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.

 

201412SG_IndyRef_7033
Bruce, Edinburgh, September 2014 © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved.

 

140919SG_IndyRef_9945
Overseas media report on the results of the independence referendum from outside the Scottish Parliament, Holyrood, Edinburgh, 19th September 2014. © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved

 

14090919SG_IndyRef_9932
Being interviewed outside the Scottish Parliament, Holyrood, Edinburgh, 19th September 2014. © Sophie Gerrard 2014 all rights reserved

 

 

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert

© Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.
Pro-Union No voters argue in the street with pro-Independence Yes voters, in the run up to the referendum in Glasgow, Scotland. © Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

512267683JS046_Referendum_D
Alex Salmond, First Minister of Scotland, talking to youths while out campaigning for a Yes vote in the Scottish independence referendum, East End of Glasgow, Scotland © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.
A heated exchange of opinions takes place between pro-Scottish independence supporters and a pro-Union supporter in the run-up to the referendum on Scottish independence in Glasgow, Scotland © Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.
A pro-Union Better Together campaign sticker reading ‘No Thanks’ is affixed to a window alongside a Union Jack flag, Glasgow, Scotland © Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.
Pro-Independence Yes supporters in George Square the day before the Scottish independence referendum, Glasgow, Scotland © Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.
Gordon Brown speaks at a pro-Union event, the day before the Scottish Independence referendum, Glasgow, Scotland © Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

© Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.
Jim Murphy MP, former Secretary of State for Scotland, arrives carrying his soapboxes as he continued his ‘100 towns in 100 days’ tour outside the Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, Scotland © Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved © Jeremy Sutton Hibbert 2014 all rights reserved.

 

 

Stephen McLaren

© Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.
Bruce Turnbull, of Leith, Edinburgh, salutes after he has cast his vote in the Independence Referendum on 18th September 2014 © Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.

 

© Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.
Men walk on a foggy Calton Hill, a famous Edinburgh landmark, as the polling boots open for the Scottish independence referendum on 18th of September 2014 © Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.

 

© Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.
A young girl standing in front of TV crews as they interview Alex Salmond, in Glasgow during the independence referendum © Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.

 

© Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.
A supporter of the No to Scottish Independence campaign, at a polling place in central Edinburgh © Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.

 

© Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.
Nicola Sturgeon being interviewed in Glasgow for radio during the independence referendum campaign © Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.

 

© Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.
George Square, Glasgow on the night of the independence referendum © Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.

 

 

This is only a small selection of the work shot by Document Scotland’s 4 photographers on the days surrounding the 18th September 2014. You can see more on each of on our websites and by following these links …

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert on Getty Images

Colin McPherson on Corbis Images

Sophie Gerrard for The Financial Times

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert in TIME

Colin McPherson in The Independent on Sunday

Sophie Gerrard in The Telegraph

Stephen McLaren and Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert for Der Spiegel

Colin McPherson in TIME

Sophie Gerrard on Instagram for The Photographers’ Gallery

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert in The Guardian, here, here, and here

Colin McPherson in The Guardian here , here and here

Sophie Gerrard for Le Monde

Colin McPherson for Le Monde

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert and Colin McPherson in Armen Magazine

Colin McPherson in The New Yorker

Photographs were also published in The Daily Record, L’express, Internazionale & Nation

Document Scotland in the British Journal of Photography and again here

Document Scotland on Photomonitor and again here

Document Scotland in The BBC

Time And Tide Wait For No Man.

Luke Brown sent us this series of images ‘Time And Tide Wait For No Man’, a look at the outdoor swimming pool areas of the Edwardian and Victorian eras. It isn’t a subject matter we’d seen covered before, and knowing nothing of Scottish outdoor pools we find it of interest and Luke has graciously shared it below with his introduction. – Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert.

 

Cellardyke Tidal Pool, East Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
Cellardyke Tidal Pool, East Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

Time And Tide Wait For No Man, by Luke Brown.

The tidal pools represent some of the last standing man made structures that do not come under scrutiny from current health and safety rules.

This is due to the period in which they were built, if built today they would be designed under the constraints imposed by present day regulations. These very rules now affect the existence of the remaining pools. They are under threat from lack of maintenance, being exposed to the harshest of elements scattered along Britain’s margins.

“A sense of superiority of English Landscape aesthetics was linked to a broader certainty that English ways were the best ways of doing things and of their natural superiority and authority over other people and places (Seymour 2000)

Britain’s sense of hierarchy over the landscape is evident up until the very edges of our coastline where the tidal swimming pools can be found, built originally for the enjoyment of newfound leisure time, and as a safe haven for swimming away from the dangers of the sea.

The structures embody the Edwardian and Victorian periods, acting as a reflection of Great Britain’s strength and power, during the reign of The British Empire. At the islands peak in 1922, Great Britain controlled almost a quarter of the Earth’s total landmass. These manmade constructions are a product and symbol of The British Empire, demonstrating England’s attitude towards controlling the land.

At present the spaces represent something very different. The tidal swimming pools now “hold an absence of order from the social laws of today that keep us in check.” (Ribas recalling Baltz) A space where freedom of expression can be celebrated, where people can make choices to act on instinct and common sense, rather than the behavioural constraints dictated upon society.

 

North Baths, Wick, North Highland, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
North Baths, Wick, North Highland, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

Pittenweem Tidal Pool, Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
Pittenweem Tidal Pool, Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

Step Rock, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
Step Rock, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

North Berwick Tidal Pool, East Lothian, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
North Berwick Tidal Pool, East Lothian, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

The pools are photographed on a 4×5 plate camera, a Victorian invention, during the tidal swimming pools downtime, the winter period, to show the landscape in its rawest state. A time when the tidal pools themselves struggle to survive under the harsh coastal weather conditions, battling against the typical British Winters to stay in existence.

But even these spaces have restrictions, the most prevalent limit being nature. The tide dictates the space and its use, however the ocean answers to the gravitational pull of the Moon. While the tide is in, the majority of the pools are hidden in an unforgiving dark mass, becoming un-swimmable. This natural occurrence still holds a very dominant sense of control over humans and the landscape, dictating the conditions of use, enjoyment and documentation.

“Time and tide wait for no man.” (Geoffrey Chaucer)

 

Portsoy Tidal Pool, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
Portsoy Tidal Pool, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

St. Monan's Tidal Pool, Anstruther, Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
St. Monan’s Tidal Pool, Anstruther, Fife, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

The Trinkie, Wick, North Highlands, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
The Trinkie, Wick, North Highlands, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

Powfoot Tidal Pool, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.
Powfoot Tidal Pool, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland. ©Luke Brown 2014.

 

Luke Brown’s photography website is here, and you can chat with him via his Twitter feed.

THE TRUTH – EVEN IF IT DIDN’T HAPPEN.

We happened upon the work of Donnie MacLean at a recent Street Level Photoworks portfolio review session. Donnie had come and had brought a small self-published book to show to myself and Sophie. It’s always a nervous moment for the reviewer, will the work be good, or will it be truly awful and you struggle for something to say, you search for any little thing to pick up on in the work. But with Donnie’s book there was none of that. It was presented as a fully formed, finished piece of work. It was intriguing to look through, to see the images of Glasgow, for me my home city, but to see a whole new take on the streets. I hadn’t been aware anyone was really working the streets photographically, and it was encouraging to discover. There was little we could tell Donnie about his photography, he already knows what he wants and how to achieve it, instead we offered our thoughts on the book itself and it’s design. It was a pleasure to see the work and graciously Donnie has allowed us to show some of it here… – Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert.

The Truth – Even If It Didn’t Happen, by Donald John MacLean.

Document Scotland- Donnie, Can you tell us how your project came about, and about the narrative/ story that these images convey?

DMacL- It all started when I was reading a book by Henry Miller, The Cosmological Eye. In the book he writes ‘the tragedy of it is that nobody sees the look of desperation on my face. Thousands and thousands of us and we’re passing one another without a look of recognition’ It really struck a cord with me and I started thinking how lonely the streets can be, so I started out on a project aiming to capture the loneliness of life within the realms of a busy city centre. To do this I decided to shoot with a Holga 120 and on black and white 120 film. The streets are unpredictable and so can the Holga be. There is a certain degree of lack of control of the camera very much like the streets. With using the Holga it offers the opportunity to capture unique images that are grainy and almost dream like, which for me was the style that would suit my approach to this project.

The images are unique, challenging, imaginative, inventive but at the same time are a reflective comment on the society that we live in. The subjects appear ghost like, lost within the busy realms of a city centre. People appear like strangers to one another. I wanted my images to be enigmatic and challenging. I wanted the viewer to feel and see the sense of doubt, pain and anguish that are visible on the streets. It is also a visual attack on consumerism, the pressure to spend money is all too apparent. I wanted to take my approach to street photography to a new level, that questioned the belief that street photography should be well composed, properly lit and in sharp focus. I wanted this project to criticise, challenge and raise awareness of the social injustices that I perceive to prevail throughout our society.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS- Your images have a very particular style, how do you achieve that? And why do you choose that style for your work, or for this project?

DMacL- Using a Holga 120 it has allowed me a creative platform to capture grainy black and white imagery that seems to resonate with the anguish of the streets.
The creative aspect of shooting with a Holga is the multi exposure technique that I have developed within this project, this technique has allowed for the creation of dramatic street images without the need for advanced photo editing skills. I also looked at the effects of side burning an over exposed roll of film. This resulted in unique effect to the image, which added to the creative nature of this project. Another important reason for choosing to shoot with this particular camera was that allowed me to blend in within streets without being noticed. It’s small, lightweight, and thus easier to carry than a DSLR. Above all it is less threatening to people on the streets.

DS- Is it a style you use on other projects or just for this one?

DMacL- I use this style only for my street projects. It took me a few years to achieve a style that I was happy with and I will continue to develop and experiment with this particular approach to street photography.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS- How long have you been photographing the streets of Glasgow? Are you out there every day? What made you want to be a street photographer?

DMacL- I have being photographing on the streets for a number of years now. I consider myself to be very fortunate to live in a city that is full of character and history. I view Glasgow as my playground where I can record and capture a rich tapestry of life. I see street photography as a very important medium in regards to understanding not only our place in the world but also as an ethnographical approach to the society that we live in. I love photographing on the streets as I feel a great sense of freedom, which is something I do not feel in the confines of a photography studio. The streets are a very exciting place to be. It helps me understand the nature of my society and also my place within it, in a sense I find a spiritual experience.

DS- I’ve found in the past, shooting in Tokyo, it is hard to be a street photographer, it’s cold, it’s lonely, it’s tiring. How do you find it on the streets of Glasgow? What are your days like?

DMacL- It can be a challenge at times. Due to my ‘in your face’ approach to street photography I have encountered many problems in the past. I have unfortunately had to experience a few violent attacks on the streets however I feel this comes with the territory. Due the society that we live in, many people are suspicious of a camera, which inevitably leads to many tribulations. However I have learned how best deal with such situations quickly. Violent and verbal attacks aside the streets are a fantastic place to be, its exciting, unpredictable, enjoyable and above all mesmerizing.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS- What’s the key to street photography? What tips and lessons can you share?

DMacL- Here are some key aspects of what I have gained from the experience and what advice I would offer to a photographer wanting to embark on a street project.

Smile, if people spot you photographing them, just smile back. A simple gesture but it works. People mostly react well to a friendly gesture.
Do not run away. If you just shoot and run people will be very suspicious towards you. I would advice if you are spotted just simply pretend that you photographing something else, a building perhaps. You will find that people will ignore you and continue on their way.
Blend in. Do not wear bright clothes or draw attention to yourself. It is vital that you merge yourself within the street scene. This will get you close to the action. I decided to wear all black whilst shooting.
Be independent. Avoid going out with others, it is best to shoot alone so that you can go at your own pace. Although people will argue for safety in numbers I fell that will curtail your ability to express and to develop your own technique and style.
Avoid zoom lenses. For me this is an easy and lazy option. If you get close to your subjects the viewer in turn will feel part of the scene. This is a very important aspect of street photography.
Patience is key. I found that I took me over a hundred photographs to get an image that I was proud of. You have too keep shooting as much as possible as it will not happen in a days work. With this in mind it is so important to take a camera with you at all times as you never know what might unfold. I missed out some excellent images at the early stages of the project simply because I had forgotten to pack my camera.
Finally, confidence will overcome fear. Street photography is not as bad as first feared. It has a lot to do with experience; it is impossible to get over your fear in one day however the fear will fade away over time. Fear becomes excitement.

DS- I see echoes of Michael Ackerman’s photography in yours, is he an influence or inspiration to you? Which other photographers do you look to?

DMacL- As a Holga 120 user Michael Ackerman is great source of inspiration. His photographs are dark often blurred with heavy grain. The subjects that he photographs appear haunted that question fact and fiction. His images are best described as melancholic. His motifs are hugely influential to my approach to street photography. His book ‘Fiction’ has a had a huge impact on me as a street photographer. With his images and to a certain degree the images that I have captured, there is a great sense of tension between the subjects and the photographer. The viewer is brought into a world that almost seems unreal, a mixture between reality and nightmare.
Another inspirational photographer who has had a huge impact on my approach to street photography is Dadio Moriyama, I have been absolutely captivated with his work. His insight into Japanese modern culture is a heavy and inspirational piece of work. He can with one image capture sadness, desperation and despair, all at the same time. His aesthetic quality to his imagery is quite remarkable. His grain and black and white tones has great impact on the viewer and I see this as been very much suited to the subject matter that he photographs. His work has been of great inspiration to me.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

'The Truth -Even If It Didn't Happen', ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.
‘The Truth -Even If It Didn’t Happen’, ©Donald MacLean 2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS- In the Blurb book that you showed us, you had a quote on each page facing the image. What was the reason for that and how did you go about choosing the quotes? Is using text alongside your images important to you?

DMacL- I had originally planned to imitate Robert Franks book ‘The Americans’, with an image on each right hand page. However this idea took a dramatic turn when I decided to include a quote with every image in the book. This decision was not taken lightly, for days I weighed up the pros and cons of including words with images. For some this a no go, however for me I felt it would not only enhance the quality of the book but also at the same time add further substance to it. Throughout the project I would collect quotes from books that have read and at time use them as inspiration for the subjects that I would photograph. So I felt that the pairing of the quotes alongside the photographs would complete the project because for me without the words I would not have been able to achieve the success of the photographs. I do not regret the decision, I am very proud of the book, I feel that the quote give the book a direction but also at the same invites the viewer to further analyse the imagery.

DS- Can people still buy your Blurb book?

DMacL- People can view and buy my book online at Blurb.

If people would like to buy a signed limited edition copy they can contact me via email at

DS- Where else can viewers see your work, or buy it from?

DMacL- On Facebook. Also expect to see a website dedicated to my street photography early next year.

As a member of the Forgotten Collective people can see my work through various exhibitions that the Collective has set up.

DS- Many thanks Donnie for your time to chat about your work, and for sharing it with us. Donnie is also on Twitter if you’d like to send him a message.

 

 

Black Gold Tide

We’re very pleased to be able to show the Shetland photographs, from the 1970s, of Scottish photographer Tom Kidd. The work was originally published as ‘Life In Shetland’, by publisher Paul Harris, and it is this book that we saw, in the home of Edinburgh photographer Murdo MacLeod, which caught our interest.

Tom Kidd has very kindly answered some questions via email about his Shetland photography, more of which can be seen here on the (Tom Kidd) Black Gold Tide website. (Make sure to look for the Browse the Archive button in the menu bar…).

 

Cowboy hat on the St. Clare, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Document Scotland- When was your Shetland project shot, and for how long did you work on it?
Tom Kidd- 1975 to 1979. I think I was there on and off for about 10 months….seemed longer.

DS- How did it come about, via a grant or bursary, or assignment?
TK- I was awarded a Kodak Bursary on leaving Napier College.

DS- What was the aim, or brief, for the project?
TK- To try and document the effect North Sea oil was having on Shetland.

DS- A lot of readers like the technical information of projects, what cameras did you shoot on, and films did you use ? Do these matter to you?
TK- All shot on Nikon FM cameras with mainly 35mm lens. Some with a 24mm and few with a 135mm I borrowed from Chick Chalmers. Mostly shot on Kodak Tri-x developed in D76. The FMs went everywhere with me. Wonderful cameras.  My wife Clare still has one and it amazes me how big and bright the viewfinder is compared to current digital cameras. I just wanted a small robust camera that was reliable.

DS- How much did you shoot over the period of the project ?
TK- Probably shot about 200 rolls, but honestly never counted. I would shoot about 20, 30 or 40 rolls then return home to Edinburgh and develop them in big batches in our darkroom in Polwarth. Sometimes with near disastrous results.

 

John and Jeanie with pet lamb, North Nesting, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Canteen glances, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

In the co-op, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Tying knots, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS- We’ve seen the books, ‘Life In Shetland‘, and ‘Black Gold Tide‘, can you tell us the story of how they came about and how they work together?
TK- Chick Chalmers was working on his ‘Life in the Orkney Islands‘ book at the same time as I was doing my Shetland project. We met as Stills Gallery was taking shape and Chick pointed me in the direction of his publisher, Paul Harris. Paul was keen to do it, and later went on to do ‘Life in Caithness and Sutherland’ by Glynn Satterley.
A book was a real bonus, and something that gave me the shove I badly needed to carry on with the whole thing. I had become disheartened, felt I wasn’t producing anything worthwhile. I had gone off to photograph a year in the life of a prep boarding school on Speyside. Going back up to Shetland with fresh eyes, a purpose and a deadline all helped. I was very fortunate to be helped and encouraged by a group of friends who really lifted the awareness of photography in Scotland in the 70’s.
Sadly their efforts in getting Stills Gallery off the ground and pushing the Scottish Arts Council into being pro photography seem to have been ignored or forgotten. The late Richard Hough (famous for his bus queues) who was one of my lecturers, and a huge influence, the late Mike Edwards whose large format landscape photography was exquisite, David Pashley who pushed the Photography course at Napier to new levels, my flatmate Chick Chalmers, Lesley Greene and Lindsay Gordon at the Scottish Arts Council. There was a real buzz at that time. I had two “models” for ‘Life in Shetland’ in the form of Chick’s Orkney book and Gus Wylie’s wonderful Hebrides book.
‘Black Gold Tide’ was Tom Morton‘s idea. It was fun to go up and shoot some more, and to go through all the old contact sheets. I found quite a few nice shots that I had never seen or noticed before. Also alarming to see how crap a lot of the early stuff was. Tom’s enthusiasm was infectious and he put the whole thing together.

DS- Did the work get exhibited?
TK- Not at the time. The Bonhoga Gallery in Shetland showed some of the pictures about 10 years ago.

 

Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Firemen, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS- How was it, as a non-Shetlander, working in Shetland on the project? Were people accommodating to the ideals of the project ? And how was the work received by the Shetlanders?
TK- Like anywhere I suppose. Some were helpful and others weren’t. BP refused me access to the terminal at Sullom Voe which didn’t help. Lots of delightful people who did help me. I was at Napier with a Shetlander, Charlie Robertson. He was a help with a few pointers.
When I first went up there, I rented a cottage in the middle of nowhere. That was quite a lonely existence, and I found it hard work. Far more productive staying in B and B’s. Living with locals just gave me a better feel for the place I think. I ran out of money fairly quickly as well, so worked on building sites and as a furniture van driver to keep going. Again, that allowed me places and people I would not have encountered otherwise. There were mixed reactions when the book came out. I think the younger folk were more open to it, while some of the older generation expected a nice gentle collection.  One review in a Shetland magazine said I made Shetland look like war torn Poland. It didn’t sell very well at the time.
Chick Chalmers unwittingly ended up with about 50 copies. The publisher closed down and Chick thought he was getting a load of copies of his own book cheap from the liquidator. I wish I could have seen his face when he discovered they were unsold copies of mine. His Orkney book had long since sold out. I gave him a Nikon camera in exchange for them.

DS- Have you been back there recently, shooting anything else? Any new projects on the go that you’d like to share with us?
TK- Not for been there for a good few years. Last time was flying the air ambulance. I have a couple of projects in mind and I will let you know when they start taking shape.

DS- Many thanks for sharing the work, and the story.

Cunningsburgh show, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Arm wrestling, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Barmaid at Magnus Bay Hotel, friday night, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Trouble in the Jubilee Bar, Lerwick, Shetland, Scotland. ©Tom Kidd, 2013, all rights reserved.

 

All images are of course Copyright © Tom Kidd 1975-2013, all rights reserved. Tom Kidd can be contacted via his Black Gold Tide website page.

Going To The Hills by Glyn Satterley

Going To The Hill

It is with great pleasure that Document Scotland can today showcase the work by Glyn Satterley, from his latest book ‘Going To The Hill, Life On Scottish Sporting Estates’.  This is the tenth book by Glyn, a renowned freelancer whose work has been widely exhibited and published in magazines. He has spent many years documenting life on Scotland’s sporting estates, and his earlier book, The Highland Game, concentrated purely on Highland estates was published in 1992. This new book brings estate life up to the present and covers the whole of Scotland.

On our blog you can view selected pages from the book, as well as watch a film in which Glyn talks with enthusiasm for the work, lifestyle and Scottish landscape.

“I have always loved this work by Glyn, and it gives me great pride to be graciously allowed to feature it here as a folio. It truly is a treat to delve into the books and archives from which this work is selected and to be able to choose images, to read Glyn’s words, and to learn about both the sporting estate lifestyle and culture, and also through the words sense Glyn’s enthusiasm for his work, and his love for Scotland’s landscape.” – Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert.

All below captions and images are © Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

 

The helicopter departs, Invercauld, Aberdeenshire. © Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“Looking somewhat dismayed, these guns were deposited high up on the Invercauld hillside in pursuit of ptarmigan. Helicopter is not the usual mode of transport, but this was a charity auction day.”

 

The Stalking Party, Glen Affric, Inverness-shire. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“On this particular day out on the hill, stalker Ronnie Buchan not only had to put up with four people in the party, but also accomodate the photographer and find a ‘shootable’ stag. Great stalker that he is, Ronnie delivered the goods.”

 

Jimmy unleashes the Glenlyon hounds, Perthshire. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“Universally, keepers and stalkers are obsessed with controlling foxes and Jimmy Lambie is no exception. He does, however, have the advantage over most other keepers who usually work single handedly, aided by only a couple of terriers. Jimmy runs a pack of thirteen fox hounds.”

 

The Beaters’ Wagon, Islay Estates, Islay. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“Rather like Dr. Who’s Tardis, a glimpse inside this wagon reveals it to be full to the gunwales, including one of the guns, umpteen beaters and a whole gang of dogs.”

 

The Cleaning Squad, Reay Forest, Sutherland. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“These ladies were heading for one of the outlying lodges on the estate to prepare for incoming guests.”

 

Morning cleaning, Glencalvie Lodge, Sutherland. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

 

‘Spring’ pointer and setter trial, Tomatin, Inverness-shire. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“These Easter-time trials are often a lottery regarding the weather. This one was brought to a halt as a snowy squall passed through, leaving the landscape covered in white, frozen, human and doggy sculptures.”

 

Loading onto the Argo, Assynt, Sutherland. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

 

The start of a long drag, Benmore, Isle of Mull. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“This was a wonderful scene, set amidst dramatic landscape, but eventually the euphoria wore off. The stag had been shot on a steep down slope, and the only way to extract it was to drag it downward, and then along the valley floor. Sounds easy, but the bottom of the valley section was a mile or two away, traversing burns every few hundred yards. The three of us shared the pulling, working two at a time, but it became more and more difficult as we got hotter and hotter, and each tiny incline felt like a mountain. The person not pulling had the added burden of carrying everybody else’s discarded clothing, plus my camera kit. You can imagine our relief when we finally got close enough for the Argo to collect it.”

 

Wind turbine grouse, Farr, Tomatin, Inverness-shire. ©Glyn Satterley 2012, all rights reserved.

“Controversial though they may be, wind turbines have revived some estates fortunes. This one at Farr required sixteen miles of road to be laid, which has given keepers access to the moor and helped with vermin control. Interestingly, the highest densities of grouse are now being recorded in and around the turbines, which probably means the blades deter raptors. It does however look and feel a little unnatural, having huge structures whirring away in the backdrop whilst people are shooting from butts.”

 

Click here to purchase Glyn Satterley’s ‘Going To The Hill, Life On Scottish Sporting Estates’.

View Glyn Satterley’s photography website and print sales page here.

 

Braer

Twenty years ago this weekend, on 5th January 1993, the Lerwick coastguard were advised that the Liberian-registered oil tanker, the MV Braer, carrying 85,000 tonnes of crude oil, was drifting without power in a storm 10 miles off of Sumburgh Head, in the Shetland Isles. The vessel eventually settled on rocks, leaking her cargo of Gulfaks crude oil, an oil which is lighter and more easily biodegradeable than North Sea crude. Nature spared the Shetland the worst of the spill, with the severe storms raging, breaking up the oil and averting  the worst case scenario of the spill.

To read more about the Braer disaster see here, and here.

 

“I was sent immediately on assignment by the Scotland On Sunday, by picture editor Kayt Turner and editor Andrew Jaspan. I flew there in a light aircraft with Ian Lang, then Secretary of State for Scotland. My brief was to get a shot of Ian Lang observing the stricken vessel from the aircraft and get a picture back for the next front page of the paper. I forget if I got the front of the paper, but I ended up staying in the Shetland for almost 2 weeks. Along with fellow Scotland on Sunday photographer Adam Elder, and journalists Euan Ferguson and Willie Paul, we covered the disaster to produce a comprehensive view of it for a following magazine issue for the paper. Due to the numbers of media who descended on the island, and a lack of rooms available, we all shared one hotel bedroom, 2 in the bed, 2 on the floor. Shetland in winter, each day the light came up about 10.30am, and it got dark again at 2’ish, time available for photographing was short. And the weather was bad.

Standing on Sumburgh Head, trying to look down on the Braer was a fight against the storm. Inch your way past the police in gas masks due to the oil spray, inch to the cliff face, the wind buffeting you hard, crouch or stand, shoot a frame or two of photographs, then crouch, turn and wipe the oil spray from your camera lens. Such were those days”- Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert

 

Oil from the Braer oil tanker washes ashore, Shetland Isles. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1993, all rights reserved.

 

Family affected by oil spray from the Braer oil tanker, Shetland Isles. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1993, all rights reserved.

 

Secretary of State for Scotland Ian Lang (centre) visits an operational centre dealing with the Braer oil tanker disaster, Shetland Isles. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1993, all rights reserved.

 

Autopsy of a seal takes place, during the Braer oil tanker disaster, Shetland Isles. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1993, all rights reserved.

 

In the offices of The Shetland Times, during the Braer oil tanker disaster, Shetland Isles. ©Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1993, all rights reserved.

 

Media filming and photographing the Braer oil tanker disaster, Shetland Isles. ©Tom Kidd1993, all rights reserved.

 

Media photographing the collection of animals and birds killed by oil from the Braer oil tanker disaster, Shetland Isles. ©Tom Kidd1993, all rights reserved.

 

The collection of birds killed by oil from the Braer oil tanker disaster, Shetland Isles. ©Tom Kidd1993, all rights reserved.

 

The MV Braer, Shetland Isles. ©Richard Baker 1993, all rights reserved.

 

The Scotland On Sunday Magazine issue covering the Braer disaster, with cover photograph by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert.

 

The work above is by Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, Tom Kidd and Richard Baker. Click their names to see their respective websites.

 

Glasgow

The mesmerising Glasgow landscapes which Martin Hunter has shot over the last decade show us a city unrecognisable from the brochures promoting the “Style Mile” or the Merchant City. In this series, Martin gone off-road, he has lugged his large-format Linhof camera around the winds of the River Kelvin and over the eastend’s “spare” ground. These are the places left behind by recession, over-run by nature, and occasionally-inhabited by groups of men who seek the outdoors for a brew and a blether.
Document Scotland caught-up with Martin and asked him to explain how these pictures came about and why, as a photographer who is largely know for his portraiture,  he felt compelled to undertake this project.

“I like Glasgow. I like the place and I like the people. But what made it world significant is dead and what makes it unique may be dying.
Glaswegians must wonder at what has happened and what is to happen with the city. What does it now do? What can it do?

As you walk around parts of the city now it’s a little like being an archaeologist stumbling through a baffling and sometimes impressive wreck. There are glimpses of the past and you can tell it must have made sense once, (100 years ago?). But I wonder now at the incoherence of the place. It‘s sodden and sad and just not making sense any more.

Many cities are like this now in the UK, but Glasgow is my home town. I’m looking it in the face every day.

These pictures feed off these feelings about the place. It’s a City that appals me and astonishes me. It baffles me and fills me with wonder.

That’s got to be worth a picture.”

Martin Hunter, photographer. Glasgow, Oct. 2012.

Glasgow, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Erskine, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Forth and Clyde Canal, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Dalmarnock, Scotland. © Martin Hunter 2012, All rights reserved.

 

‘White House’, Glasgow, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Red Road flats, Glasgow, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Gorbals, Glasgow, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Glasgow, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Forth and Clyde Canal, Glasgow, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

Forth and Clyde Canal, Glasgow, Scotland © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

All images and text are © Martin Hunter 2012, all rights reserved.

 

 

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