‘Klondykers in Shetland’

*** New just in! There’s going to be a second edition of the book printed. Another 150 are being printed to meet demands! More news soon, once they’re available ***

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert’s fourth Café Royal Book was released last Thursday, and very nicely sold out overnight! Thank you everyone for your interest and support.

Klondykers in Shetland 1994‘ is the last collaboration from Jeremy and Craig Atkinson at Café Royal for this year. If you do wish to try and get your hands on one then Street Level Photoworks in Glasgow, the shop at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, and possibly Foyles in London, have limited numbers still I believe.

Klondykers, Shetland 1994
Release Date 18.11.15
28 pages
14cm x 20cm
b/w digital
Edition of 150

 

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“There’s blue on red, red on red, green on black, and that one over there is just rust on rust”, chortled the Coast Guard helicopter pilot as we flew over the waters of the Shetland isles and looked down on the fleet of East European ‘Klondyker’ fish factory ships all moored, all awaiting the arrival of the silver fish.

It was the early 1990’s, Communism had collapsed and new economies were struggling in Eastern Europe. Ships had been sent to Scottish waters to buy up the mackerel and herring catches, and take them back frozen or tinned to feed Bulgaria, Romania and the countries of the former Soviet bloc.

But the arrival of the Klondykers as they were known was gaining unwanted attention, ships were running aground all too frequently on the rocks of Shetland, and on visits into port others were detained, deemed as being unseaworthy. With ships impounded, and without work, crews went unpaid, and the men speaking no English drifted to the garbage dumps to look for items which could be salvaged, recycled, and taken back to Eastern Europe.

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I went to the Shetland twice, around 1994, to photograph, both times on assignment, badgering fish merchant agents to take me out to the ships on their speedboats when they visited to cut deals with Bulgarian skippers. Or another time I agreed with the Coast Guard to be used as ‘live practice’, to be lowered by harness and winch onto a moving ship in exchange for getting up in their helicopter to shoot aerial shots of the Klondyker fleet. I readily agreed, for the excitement, for the adventure, and for the access knowing that Colin Jacobson, then picture editor at the Independent Saturday Magazine, would never hire me a helicopter.

Cyrillic signs hung in Lerwick town centre, telling the men of the Klondykers where they could find the Fisherman’s Mission, where they could find God, cups of tea and some help, and you could spot the men as they walked the town, in their Eastern European fashions of leather jackets and jeans. Up at the garbage dump I photographed as islanders drove up to offer the Klondyker men old televisions and electronics, or just to stop by and bring them cigarettes and gifts.

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Out on the ships I got lucky and found myself on a ship crewed by Romanians, and I managed to use the little Romanian language skills I’d learned while working on another project outside of Bucharest. I chatted with the ship’s doctor, and he played his accordion for me, we toured the ship, and I photographed as men and women worked, cleaning the mackerel which had just arrived, or played table tennis as they awaited more fish.

The ships have gone now, but the word Klondyker still holds resonance in the Shetland, and of course upon the rocks are the ships which never left. – Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert.

 

Visit Café Royal Books website.

 

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Nelson Mandela, Glasgow 1993.

I’m very pleased to let you know that the black and white images I took of Nelson Mandela, in Glasgow in 1993, when he came to here to receive the Freedom of the City (and which I’ve written about previously), have been published as a little book by the industrious Craig Atkinson at Café Royal Books.

On November 21st at Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, I’ll be doing a Q&A about my recent publications with Café Royal, as well as my Unsullied And Untarnished book. Fellow photographers Sophie Gerrard, Chris Leslie and Simon Crofts will also be there talking of their recent publications.

Many thanks,  Jeremy.

 

Jeremy Sutton—Hibbert
Nelson Mandela Glasgow 1993
05.11.15
28 pages
14cm x 20cm
b/w digital
Edition of 150

Available from Café Royal Books, in limited numbers.

 

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert— Nelson Mandela Glasgow 1993

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert— Nelson Mandela Glasgow 1993

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert— Nelson Mandela Glasgow 1993

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert— Nelson Mandela Glasgow 1993

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert— Nelson Mandela Glasgow 1993

Jeremy Sutton Hibbert— Nelson Mandela Glasgow 1993

 

A few copies are also on sale at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh, where the Document Scotland ‘The Ties That Bind‘ show continues, and Street Level Photoworks, Glasgow, have some of the Mandela books also.

 

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Cafe Royal Books

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We are delighted to announce that publisher Cafe Royal Books has produced a very special, limited edition box set of work by Document Scotland’s four photographers.

Timed to coincide with our exhibition entitled The Ties That Bind, which opens at the end of September at the Scottish National Portrait Gallery in Edinburgh, the compendium of work comprises four photo-essays, each with their own distinctive flavour.

The editions were produced as individual publications, but the man behind Cafe Royal Books, publisher Craig Atkinson, has gone the extra mile by bringing the four into one and presenting them in a slim, but stylish box.

The four stories featured are:

North Sea Fishing (Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert)

Aboard the seine netter Argosy. Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert, 1995, all rights reserved.

Aboard the seine netter Argosy. Photograph © Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert 1995, all rights reserved.

 

Dookits (Stephen McLaren)

A solitary dookit. Photograph © Stephen McLaren, 2015, all rights reserved.

A solitary dookit. Photograph © Stephen McLaren 2014, all rights reserved.

 

Tunnock’s (Sophie Gerrard)

Mr Boyd Tunnock. Photograph © Sophie Gerrard 2013, all rights reserved.

Mr Boyd Tunnock. Photograph © Sophie Gerrard 2013, all rights reserved.

 

Sancta Maria Abbey, Nunraw (Colin McPherson)

Monks at dawn prayers in the chapel at Sancta Maria Abbey at Nunraw. Photograph © Colin McPherson, 1996 all rights reserved.

Monks at dawn prayers in the chapel at Sancta Maria Abbey at Nunraw. Photograph © Colin McPherson 1996 all rights reserved.

 

Each edition will be available to purchase through Cafe Royal Books website and at the SNPG at the launch of our show. The box set – limited to an edition of 50 – is also available directly from the publisher. Grab one quick before they are all snapped up!

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The Gorbals

The Gorbals, a ‘zine by John Claridge, published by Cafe Royal Books.

 

Over here at Document Scotland we were recently excited to find out that Craig Atkinson, under his Cafe Royal Books publishing name, was going to be publishing a book of photographs from the Gorbals area of Glasgow, by renowned advertising and portrait photographer John Claridge. Our curiosity was piqued, we hadn’t known that John Claridge had done such photography, his premenence as an advertising photographer, for which he has been widely awarded within the industry, goes before him. But who knew that he’d done black and white in Glasgow’s Gorbals? We had to find out more, and very nicely and graciously Cafe Royal Books have allowed us to preview their new ‘zine, and John Claridge took some time out from his schedule to answer a few questions for us.

The Gorbals, a ‘zine by John Claridge, published by Cafe Royal Books.

The Gorbals, a ‘zine by John Claridge, published by Cafe Royal Books.

 

Document Scotland– Sir, you’ve had an extensive career, and to the younger viewer editorial or documentary work is perhaps not what first springs to mind when we think of your own work, we think more of advertising, and portraiture, so how does the Gorbals work fit into your career? Did you shoot a lot of editorial reportage?
John Claridge– I’ve always shot documentary and editorial work. When I was on an advertising assignment I would always find time and take time out to shoot my personal work. When shooting an advertising campaign I guess you’re looking for and solving solutions based on a specific brief. With my personal work, I’m exploring my own psyche and opinion about the world.

The Gorbals, a ‘zine by John Claridge, published by Cafe Royal Books.

 

The Gorbals, Glasgow. © John Claridge 1965-2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS– When was the Gorbals work shot,  were you there on assignment, or for personal work? You’re from London’s East End,  we wondered did you feel an affiliation to the Gorbals area and the people? You seem to have had access to homes, how receptive were the people to being photographed?
JC– The Gorbals pictures were shot in 1965 over a two-day period for a charity to bring awareness of the dire circumstances people were living in. The majority of these pictures have never been published before. Only one or two have ever been seen. Being from London’s East End I certainly felt an affinity. The people in the Gorbals seemed to have a similar resilience, generosity and sense of humour despite their terrible circumstances and living conditions. I would never want to change my background or where I came from. Times were hard, but in a strange way living was easy. Not one day went by without laughing at something. Sharing and spending time with people who have real soul.

 

Scottish Landscapes, a ‘zine by John Claridge, published by Cafe Royal Books.

 

Scottish Landscapes, a ‘zine by John Claridge, published by Cafe Royal Books.

 

DS– And the Scottish Landscapes work, how did that come about? Is there a particular part of Scotland which drew you in, or draws you back?
JC– I’ve been shooting Scottish landscapes for a number of years. I adore Scotland. I think the Highlands are one of the most beautiful places in the world. For me the Highlands have so much beauty, history, mystery and tragedy. It’s always amused me with all this magic, that some advertising campaigns depict it with happy families, loads a sun, and ice cream!

H. V. Morton puts it into perspective when he wrote: “The heathery moors slope down to a distant valley. The sun is setting. The sky above the Lammermuirs is red and troubled. The wind drops. Faint white serpents of mist twist above the greenwood, outlining the course of stream and river. It is a study in blue. In the foreground, like a promise of the Highlands, and as notable as a ship at sea”.

 

Scottish Landscapes, a ‘zine by John Claridge, published by Cafe Royal Books.

 

Scottish Landscapes. © John Claridge 2013, all rights reserved.

 

DS– You’ve had a huge career, seen the world, and been awarded many times, what draws you to printing your work in small, limited edition ‘zines nowadays? What is the attraction for you?
JC– I think CRBs books have an honesty and rawness, which sadly is lacking in many publications today. Also they seem to be acquiring cult status. And, of course, a real pleasure to work with.

DS– What are you working on at present and what can we look forward to next?
JC– I’ve just finished a series of b&w portraits of ex-boxers and am now working on some older work about Britain’s industrial past.

DS– Thank you John, and Cafe Royal Books, for allowing us to show your work and taking the time to answer a few questions. Best wishes to you.

The website of photographer John Claridge is here, and Cafe Royal Books ordering page is here. Please feel free to show your appreciation for the work to Cafe Royal Books on Twitter.

Right, we’re off to buy John’s books…

 

 

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